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Daily News Analysis 02-03-2016

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

Pak team may arrive soon to probe Pathankot attack (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     As the decks were cleared for the visit of Pakistani investigators to India to probe the attack on Pathankot airbase, India will ask the neighbouring country about the composition of the team and the contents of the evidence required by them.

2.

India kicks off Raisina Dialogue (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     Calling for greater South Asian cooperation and economic integration, former Sri Lankan President Chandrika Kumaratunga said the tensions between India and Pakistan have held back South Asian integration.

3.

Myanmar vote: hopes fade for Suu Kyi (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Myanmars Parliament will bring forward a vote for the next President to March 10, it was announced on Tuesday, leaving little time for Aung San Suu Kyi to strike a deal to let her take the top office.

4.

UN postpones N. Korea sanctions vote to Wednesday (P 14)

a)     International

a)     The UN Security Council delayed until Wednesday a vote on a new raft of sanctions on North Korea to punish the reclusive regime after its fourth nuclear test and rocket launch.

5.

US, Iraq plan battle for Mosul (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Recent gains against the Islamic State in eastern Syria have helped sever critical supply lines to Iraq and set the stage for what will be the biggest fight yet against the Sunni militancy, the battle to retake Mosul.

6.

Britain embattled over Europe (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     It is a bombshell which could dislodge Britain from arguably the most successful supranational union of modern times.

7.

Looking beyond economic quick-fixes (Page 10)

a)     International

b)     Economy

a)     Finance ministers and central bank governors of the Group of 20 countries meeting in Shanghai drove home the complexities of formulating a collective response to the persisting global slowdown in growth.

8.

Headley testimony proves those killed were LeT members: petition (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     In his petition in the Supreme Court, Advocate Manohar Lal Sharma said the judicial facts and evidence supplied by 26/11 accused David Headley through videoconference in the special court in Mumbai on Feb 11 proved that the four persons (including Ishrat) killed by the  police were members of the Lashkar-e-Taiba.

9.

The health net should cover all (Page 10)

a)     National

b)     Health

a)     The announcement in the Union Budget of an insurance scheme against catastrophic health expenditure for the weaker sections should become part of a calibrated plan to provide universal health coverage.

10.

NDA allies seek rollback of tax on withdrawals from EPF (Pages 1, 12)

a)     National

b)     Economy

a)     A day after the Union Budget was presented, the ruling BJP faced political heat over the decision to tax a certain proportion of the savings in the Employees Provident Fund at the time of withdrawal.

11.

Budget could help achieve 4 percent growth in agriculture sector (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)    Union Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh said the Union Budget would put the agricultural sector towards path of progress and would help in addressing agriculture distress and achieve 4 percent growth.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

Pak team may arrive soon to probe Pathankot attack (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Pakistan relations

b)     Terrorism

c)     Pathankot terror attack

d)     Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM)

a)     As the decks were cleared for the visit of Pakistani investigators to India to probe the attack on Pathankot airbase, India will ask the neighbouring country about the composition of the team and the contents of the evidence required by them.

b)     India has accused the Pakistan-based outfit JeM of planning and executing the attack on the airbase on the intervening night of Jan 1-2.

c)     A senior official said the decision to let the Pakistani team access the airbase (a highly sensitive defence installation) would be taken by PM Modi and National Security Adviser Ajit Doval.

d)     After India gave evidence, Pakistan registered a FIR a few days ago. The Counter Terrorism Division of Pakistani Police arrested three suspects.

2.

India kicks off Raisina Dialogue (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Pakistan conflicts

b)     Raisina Dialogue

c)     Shangri-La dialogue

d)     Munich Conference on national security

a)     Calling for greater South Asian cooperation and economic integration, former Sri Lankan President Chandrika Kumaratunga said the tensions between India and Pakistan have held back South Asian integration.

b)    Kumaratunga was amongst a high-power panel of former South Asian leaders, as well as External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and Bangladesh Foreign Minister A.H. Mahboob Ali at the first Raisina Dialogue, hosted by Ministry of External Affairs in Delhi.

c)     Kumaratunga said that India-Pakistan conflicts have prevented regional integration, adding that not just India and Pakistan, but six of eight SAARC countries (omitting Bhutan and Maldives) have spent the past decades consolidating their identities and inter-state tensions.

d)     The conference is being seen as the govts attempt to rival conferences around the world that attract global players such as the Shangri-La dialogue in Singapore, and the Munich Conference on national security.

3.

Myanmar vote: hopes fade for Suu Kyi (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Myanmar internal issues

b)     Myanmars Constitution

c)     Myanmars Parliament

d)     National League for Democracy (NLD) party

 

a)     Myanmars Parliament will bring forward a vote for the next President to March 10, leaving little time for Aung San Suu Kyi to strike a deal to let her take the top office.

b)     The countrys democracy figurehead is currently banned from becoming President under the junta-era Constitution.

c)     Suu Kyi has held several rounds of closed-door talks with the powerful military since her NLD party won crushing victory at elections in November. Observers say the talks were likely aimed at testing the militarys appetite for a constitutional change to allow Suu Kyi to the top job, a post many of Myanmars people see as her destiny.

4.

UN postpones N. Korea sanctions vote to Wednesday (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     North Koreas nuclear arsenal

b)     UNSC

a)     The UN Security Council delayed until Wednesday a vote on a new raft of sanctions on North Korea to punish the reclusive regime after its fourth nuclear test and rocket launch.

b)     With backing from China, the council is expected to adopt a US-drafted resolution that takes aim at North Koreas nuclear and ballistic missile programs by cutting off sources of hard currency and access to technology.

c)     The US has described the package of measures as the toughest sanctions yet to hit North Korea, but the impact will depend largely on China, Pyongyangs sole ally and main benefactor.

d)     North Korea carried out its fourth nuclear test on January 6, which was followed by the launch on February 7 of a satellite-bearing rocket that the world viewed as a disguised ballistic missile test.

e)     Both tests are banned under a series of UN resolutions that condemn North Koreas nuclear and ballistic missile programs as a threat to world peace and security.

f)     The latest draft would require countries to take the unprecedented step of inspecting all cargo to and from North Korea, impose new trade restrictions and bar vessels suspected of carrying illegal goods for North Korea from ports.

5.

US, Iraq plan battle for Mosul (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Syria and Iraq crisis

b)     Islamic State (IS)

c)     Kurdish forces

 

a)     Pentagon officials said the recent gains against the IS in eastern Syria have helped sever critical supply lines to Iraq and set the stage for what will be the biggest fight yet against the Sunni militancy, the battle to retake Mosul.

b)     US-backed forces had begun laying the groundwork for the fight by moving to isolate Mosul from the ISs de facto headquarters in Raqqa, Syria. Kurdish and Arab forces retook the town of Shaddadi in eastern Syria last week, cutting off what Defense Secretary Ash Carter called last major artery between Raqqa and Mosul.

c)     In addition to the advances in eastern Syria, the Pentagon has begun using cyber-attacks on IS communications between Raqqa and Mosul, as well as attacks meant to disrupt the militant groups ability to use social media to recruit fighters.

d)     Expert said that retaking Mosul would be a massive hit to IS. Such a loss would bolster claims by the US-led coalition that the Sunni militancy is on the run in Iraq. It could also sharply demoralise IS fighters, raising questions about whether the group could still credibly call itself a caliphate.

6.

Britain embattled over Europe (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     EU referendum

b)     European Union (EU)

c)     Brexit

d)     Conservative Party

e)     Labour Party

a)     According to the author, Britains governing Conservative Party has for decades been divided over Europe - and it has unsightly scars to prove it. But the civil war that is now breaking out in the party could make past rows seem almost puny.

b)     PM David Cameron has called a referendum on June 23 to redeem his pledge to give the country a vote on whether it wants to be in or out of the 28-member EU. He says the revised terms negotiated in a whirlwind round of diplomacy mean that the UK should remain within the EU, and that the countrys prestige, prosperity and security depend on that.

c)     To Camerons dismay, ranged against him are six members of his own Cabinet, more than a third of his partys MPs and a clear majority of his own party activists. Among the leave rebels is Justice Secretary Michael Gove, one of the Prime Ministers oldest friends and hitherto closest allies.

d)     The roots of the EU lie in the aftermath of the Second World War with the search for ties across European boundaries to prevent the two great continental powers (France and Germany) from ever again taking up arms against each other. Britain was not initially on board, but became seventh member country in early 1970s.

e)     At that stage, the EU was generally known as the Common Market, a free-trade zone much more than a political alliance. The EU expanded to almost every corner of Europe, particularly after the implosion of the Moscow-led Communist bloc in eastern Europe.

f)     Half a billion people now live in EU member states, powerful nations including Serbia and Turkey are queuing up to join, and no member state has ever left the EU - at least, not yet.

g)     While the EUs most enthusiastic members pledged ever closer union, with talk of a common foreign policy, a European army and more decision-making by majority vote rather than unanimity, British politicians warned of EU waste and bureaucracy.

h)     And an influx to the UK of hundreds of thousands of migrants in search of better-paid jobs from new member countries (notably Poland, Romania and Bulgaria) swelled misgivings about the EU.

i)     Cameron is staging a referendum to try to end his partys feuding over Europe. He is giving the UK a vote in hope that a decision to remain in Europe will close the matter.

j)     In his renegotiations, he was not able to limit the free movement of EU nationals, which is seen as a fundamental principle of the Union and is non-negotiable for many member states. But he has managed to restrict some welfare benefits for new migrants from within the EU.

k)   The main opposition parties (Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish nationalists) all support continued membership of the EU, though with different degrees of enthusiasm. The business lobby is also largely in favour of staying in. Cameron hopes that this awkward alliance will be sufficient to deliver him victory.

l)     It is still likely that the referendum will endorse Britains continued place in Europe - but with one of the biggest hitters in politics now raining down blows on the EU, there is a real uncertainty about the outcome. One thing is clear - Britain faces a tempestuous few months until referendum day.

7.

Looking beyond economic quick-fixes (Page 10)

a)     International

b)     Economy

a)     Global economic growth

b)     Economic recession

c)     Global financial crisis

d)     G-20

e)     IMF

a)     Finance ministers and central bank governors of G-20 countries meeting in Shanghai drove home the complexities of formulating a collective response to persisting global slowdown in growth, even as the IMF reiterated its call for coordinated action at the multilateral level to contain risks to the real economies from market turbulence.

b)     The Funds prescription ahead of the gathering lays particular stress on fiscal stimulus measures to boost demand, as against over-reliance on monetary policies. But the reaction from national capitals was along expected lines.

c)     US Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew pressed hard a long-standing concern of US that China ought to increase domestic consumption and Germany adopt fiscal stimulus. He even suggested that it may be a case of financial markets misreading the situation on the state of the real economy.

d)     Despite the strong divergence of perceptions that have long underpinned the groups overall approach, their promise in Shanghai to refrain from a competitive devaluation of currencies to promote exports could go some way to soothe investor sentiment.

e)     Currency volatilities could continue to pose concerns as emerging economies experienced a slowdown in 2015 - most notably Brazil, and China, which earlier this decade overtook the US as the worlds largest trading nation.

f)     According to World Trade Monitor of Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, the economic recession in Brazil and the combined effects of collapse of Chinese imports into Latin America, could well have had a significant impact on world trade, which contracted to its lowest since the global financial crisis.

g)    Yet, there is good evidence of G-20s capacity for concerted action. In 2014, it pledged to take steps to raise the groups GDP by an additional 2 percent by 2018. The measures implemented so far would cause an increase of just 0.8 percent by that deadline.

h)   The current situation should lend greater urgency not merely to achieve the goal, but to extend the measures into other areas that have been identified for common action. The political engagement from the G-20 in the wake of the 2008 global meltdown was immense.

i)     That resulted in the fiscal stimulus, the stabilisation of the banking sector and the injection of capital into international financial institutions. The rich and emerging economies should summon the resolve and the will to promote a more equitable international order.

8.

Headley testimony proves those killed were LeT members: petition (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Mumbai 26/11 terror attack

b)     Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT)

c)     Supreme Court

d)     Article 21 of the Constitution

 

a)     In his petition in Supreme Court, Advocate Manohar Lal Sharma (seeking closure of all criminal proceedings against Gujarat police officers in the 2004 Ishrat Jahan encounter case) said the judicial facts and evidence supplied by 26/11 accused David Headley through videoconference in the special court in Mumbai on Feb 11 proved that the four persons (including Ishrat) killed by the police were members of LeT.

b)     The then UPA govt had submitted two affidavits (one that the four, who were killed in an alleged fake encounter, were terrorists, and the second saying there was no conclusive evidence) within two months in 2009.

c)     The petition said Article 21 (protection of life and personal liberty) does not extend to terrorists. It asked the Supreme Court to issue a proper writ direction declaring that killing a terrorist is not an offence under the Indian law.

d)   The BJP has demanded that the Modi government launch a probe to find out who got the UPA affidavit on Ishrat Jahan changed to remove references to her links with the militant organisation Laskhar-e-Taiba.

9.

The health net should cover all (Page 10)

a)     National

b)     Health

a)     Union Budget 2016-17

b)     Universal Health Coverage (UHC)

c)     National Dialysis Services Programme

a)     The announcement in the Union Budget of an insurance scheme against catastrophic health expenditure for weaker sections should become part of a calibrated plan to provide universal health coverage.

b)     When it comes to public health expenditure, India brings up the rear among even many developing countries. Budget 2016-17 takes the incremental step of introducing some insurance protection against high out-of-pocket expenditure that pushes families into poverty.

c)     In this context, the plan to provide access to dialysis for kidney failure at district hospitals through a dedicated national programme is an intervention that is overdue.

d)     Some States (such as Tamil Nadu) have insurance to pay for hospitalisation through a government-backed plan. As a scaled-up national programme, there is much to learn from the experience of countries such as Thailand and Japan.

e)     A nominal increase in the annual health budget, pegged at 9.5 percent over 2015-16, and a growing role for profit-oriented care systems and private insurance can only retard Indias progress towards universal health coverage.

f)     Creating human resources needed has to be accorded top priority. The dialysis programme underscores the importance of preventing end-stage renal disease, and regular monitoring of kidney health at the population level.

10.

NDA allies seek rollback of tax on withdrawals from EPF (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     National

b)     Economy

a)     Union Budget 2016-17

b)     Employees Provident Fund (EPF)

a)     A day after the Union Budget was presented, the ruling BJP faced political heat over the decision to tax a certain proportion of savings in the Employees Provident Fund at the time of withdrawal.

b)     No tax would accrue for withdrawal of EPF for those with income of Rs. 15,000 and below.

c)     Finance Minister Jaitley will move an amendment to the budget proposal on the taxation of withdrawal of investments from the Employees Provident Fund.

d)     The amended proposal will make only the interest accrued on 60 percent of the contributions made after April 1 2016 taxable.  

11.

Budget could help achieve 4 percent growth in agriculture sector (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)     Union Budget 2016-17

b)     Agriculture sector

a)    Union Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh said the Union Budget would put the agricultural sector towards path of progress and would help in addressing agriculture distress and achieve 4 percent growth.

b)     He said the budgetary provision of Rs. 35,984 crore for Agriculture and Farmers Welfare Ministry - 2016-2017 manifests that NDA govt is committed to villages, the poor and farmers.

c)     He said the govt aims to double the income of farmers in the next five years.

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