Current Affairs > Daily Current affairs

Back
Daily News Analysis 20-05-2015

 

S.NO.

NEWS   ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE   OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

Modi heads home from Seoul (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     PM Modi left for home after wrapping up his   6-day tour that took him to China, Mongolia and South Korea where he held   bilateral talks and signed many pacts to strengthen Indias relations with the   three countries.

2.

Go forward on India-EU talks (Page 8)

a)     I.R

a)     The European   Unions Ambassador to India last week expressed keenness to follow the   India-EU Free Trade Agreement talks. The desire is mutual.

3.

Sirisena vows to strengthen reconciliation (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     Promising not   to allow another war in the country, Sri Lankan President Sirisena criticised   the previous Rajapaksa regime for not attaching importance to the process of   reconciliation during the period immediately following the Eelam War-IV.

4.

Modi and his Chakravyuh (Page 9)

a)     National

a)     The   Chakravyuh in the Mahabharata was a seven-ringed, impenetrable battle   formation. In his first year, the PM Modi has successfully broken through two   circles. But there are five more to go.

5.

We are pushed to competitive monetary easing: Rajan (Page   13)

a)     Economy

a)     RBI Governor   Rajan has asserted that the current non-system in international monetary   policy is a source of substantial risk, both to sustainable growth and to the   financial sector.

6.

The Big Data conundrum (Pages 1 and 11)

a)     S&T

a)     Expert said   that all the data is flowing in optic fibre cable. If not, it is definitely   stored in a non-meteorological cloud somewhere. Its name is Big Data.

7.

Indias eye on universe ready for tests (Page 7)

a)     S&T

b)     Geography

a)     A fully   assembled Astrosat (Indias first space observatory) is ready for intensive   tests before its launch around October.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S.NO.

NEWS   ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT   POINTS

1.         

 

Modi heads home from Seoul (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     India – South   Korea relations

b)     Special   Strategic Partnership

c)     Trade ties

d)     Make in India

a)     PM Modi left for home after wrapping up   his six-day tour that took him to China, Mongolia and South Korea where he   held bilateral talks and signed many pacts to strengthen Indias relations   with the three countries.

b)     He held wide-ranging talks with the   leadership of the three nations and also tried investors for his Make in   India campaign.

c)     In South Korea, Modi and President Park   held discussions and resolved to add new substance, speed and content   covering defence, trade and investment, and regional cooperation to take the   bilateral ties to a higher level.

d)     South Korea decided to provide $ 10   billion to India for infrastructure, development of smart cities, railways,   power generation and other diversified areas as two countries agreed to   upgrade their bilateral ties to a Special Strategic Partnership.

2.

Go forward on India-EU talks (Page 8)

a)     I.R

a)     India – EU   relations

b)    India-EU   summit

c)     India-EU Free   Trade Agreement

d)     Broad-based   Trade and Investment Agreement (BTIA)

e)     OECD

f)     FDI

a)     The EUs   Ambassador to India (Joao Cravinho) last week expressed keenness to follow   the India-EU Free Trade Agreement talks. The desire is mutual.

b)     As he   mentioned, the meeting of the OECD countries scheduled for June offers an   opportunity for both sides to draw up a road map. The EU identified India as   a strategic partner in 2004. A Joint Action Plan was signed in 2005 and   negotiations on proposed BTIA were launched in June 2007.

c)     Eight years   down the line, some contentious issues still remain. In the backdrop of PM   Modis visit to France and Germany in April came the cancellation of the   India-EU summit, apparently for logistical reasons. Issues such as the EU ban   on import of mangoes from India announced in May 2014 and the legal   proceedings in India involving Italian Marines are also factors that have   left the relationship strained.

d)     The EU is one   of Indias largest trading partners and a major source of FDI. India has   concluded agreements with ASEAN, Japan, Singapore and Korea. With the EU the   scale of the deal is more ambitious and consequently disagreements.

e)     For instance,   the EU is unhappy with Indias protectionism in the automobile sector and   wants steep cuts in duties, and tariff cuts in things such as wine, spirits   and dairy products. But tariff cuts in the agricultural sector would mean   Europes heavily subsidised agro industry will dump its surplus here, hitting   Indian farmers. Indias generic drug market also raises intellectual property   concerns for European pharmaceutical corporations.

f)     On the other hand, India is unhappy with the   EU not recognising it as a data secure nation, and with what the EU has to   offer in the area of IT/BPO/KPO services and the movement of skilled professionals.   But the EU is no doubt keen on partnering with India in programmes such as   Make in India, Swachh Bharat and Smart City projects.

g)     Another   criticism levelled against the FTA talks has been over lack of transparency   and inadequate consultations with civil society participants. These concerns   will also have to be remedied in future rounds of dialogue. It is to be hoped   that the whole process would now gain momentum and lead to a negotiated deal.

3.

Sirisena vows to strengthen reconciliation (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     Sri Lankan   internal issues

b)       Reconciliation process

c)     Eelam War-IV

d)     LTTE

a)       Promising not to allow another war in the country, Sri Lankan   President Sirisena criticised the previous Rajapaksa regime for not attaching   importance to the process of reconciliation during the period immediately   following the Eelam War-IV.

b)     Pointing   out that reconciliation could not be achieved only through development, he said   the process included investigating truth, carrying out justice, eliminating   fear and mistrust and building trust among every community and rebuilding   physical resources that were devastated during the armed conflict.

c)     He   said instructions had been given to the security chiefs to work out a new   national security system and plan.

4.

Modi and his Chakravyuh (Page 9)

a)     National

a)     Good   Governance

b)     Foreign   policy

c)     Land Acquisition Bill  

d)     Social impact   assessment (SIA)

e)     Pradhan   Mantri Jan Dhan Yojana

f)     Pradhan   Mantri Jeevan Jyoti Bima Yojana

g)     Pradhan   Mantri Suraksha Bima Yojana

h)     Atal Pension   Yojana        

a)     The Chakravyuh in the Mahabharata was a   seven-ringed, impenetrable battle formation. In his first year, the PM Modi   has successfully broken through two circles. But there are five more to go. Let us see what   the seven circles of Indian polity are.

b)     At the outermost seventh circle is   foreign policy. This is the countrys interface with the world - the   neighbourhood, the region, and the global political and economic order. Here,   Modi has been the most effective, gaining the attention of different international   power groups and having them compete for Indias friendship.

c)     From getting the UN to declare   International Yoga Day on June 21 to having the US President as Chief Guest   for Republic Day to establishing a BRICS development bank to land swaps with   Bangladesh, Modi has passed the first circle by neutralising the Left and   ignoring the Right. There is a distinct Nehruvian touch to his foreign   policy.

d)     The second circle too he has been able   to penetrate. This is building a political coalition for governance. By   winning elections with a single party majority and ending the era of   compromise and coalition politics and then winning several State elections, he   has started a new phase of decisive national politics.

e)     Modi has now reached the third circle -   the instruments of governance. Here, the struggle has just begun. There are   some good policies, such as Pradhan Mantri Jan Dhan Yojana, the Pradhan   Mantri Jeevan Jyoti Bima Yojana, Pradhan Mantri Suraksha Bima Yojana and the   Atal Pension Yojana, but these have to be seen in tandem with plans to   reverse the SIA and consent clause of the Land Acquisition Bill, the hasty   environmental clearances, and the near-zero interaction with the media in   India.

f)     It is at the fourth circle (the respect   for democratic and parliamentary institutions) that Modis achievements begin   to look thin. Ordinances are frequently resorted to. The ordinance has become   Modis instrument of choice not just in the very visible land acquisition   issue but also with respect to his desire to give a govt job to just one outdated   officer.

g)     In the fourth circle, he is making   little headway. It is too early to determine whether he has the capability to   strengthen institutions or undermine them but we need another year to find   out.

h)     It is in the fifth circle that he begins   to lose his capability to determine outcomes. This is the circle that   concerns the public discourse of a plural society; the discourse required to   build a modern democratic state. Entering it requires informed intervention,   speech and actions that support and consolidate the critical temper required   by the humanist aspirations of a modern India.

i)     If Modi gets through the five circles   described above, the real test will begin in the sixth (political philosophy)   and seventh (personal ethics) circles. One cannot govern a pluralist country   like India with a philosophy crafted in a shakha. At its core must be a   commitment to secularism and social justice.

5.

We are pushed to competitive monetary easing: Rajan (Page   13)

a)     Economy

a)     Monetary policy

b)     Unconventional monetary policy

c)     RBI

a)     RBI Governor Rajan has asserted that   current non-system in international monetary policy is a source of   substantial risk, both to sustainable growth and to the financial sector.

b)     He said it was not an industrial country   problem. It was also not an emerging market problem. It is a problem of   collective action.

c)     He argued for stronger and   well-capitalised multilateral institutions with widespread legitimacy. Some   of them could provide patient capital while others could monitor new rules of   the game.

d)     He elaborated in detail the emerging strong   tendency for unconventional monetary policy and its fall-out on the emerging   markets. Unconventional monetary policies include both policies where the central   bank attempts to commit to hold interest rates at near zero for long, as well   as policies that affect central bank balance sheets such as buying assets in   certain markets in order to affect market prices.

6.

The Big Data conundrum (Pages 1 and 11)

a)     S&T

a)     Big Data

b)     Cloud computing

c)     UID-Aadhar project

d)     Evidence-based policy-making

 

a)     Why is the govt so anxious to make the   ownership of an Aadhar card, which is officially voluntary, practically   mandatory? Why is Facebook developing solar-powered drones to beam Internet   from the sky? And why do both Facebook and Gmail keep troubling us for our   cell phone number?

b)     Expert said that all the data is flowing   in optic fibre cables. If not, it is definitely stored in a   non-meteorological cloud somewhere. Its name is Big data.

c)     The UID-Aadhar project will be the   largest such citizen database on the planet. The reason Myntra wants its   customers to transact only from apps is that consumer data is most valuable   when tied to specific individuals, as it enables a closer tracking of user   behaviour. It is also why Google, Facebook, and other tech companies want our   mobile number.

d)     If a world governed on the basis of big   data is indeed the future, then what does this predict for humanity? The   dominant consensus right now is hugely positive. But if we search deeper, the   use of big data and what it would entail for the future of human lives will solve   a problematic picture.

e)     According to the optimists, big data, a   world where the vast majority of gadgets, machines, and humans are connected   to the internet and to each other - promises a future where all important   decisions about business, life, and society would be taken purely on the   basis of data.

f)     There is a name for such decision-making   driven purely by big data analytics. Its called evidence-based   decision-making. It can and does pay off brilliantly in business operations.   It is ideal also for predicting the weather, or earthquakes and so on.

g)     Besides, big data already plays a major   role in the management of infrastructure and industry, not to mention   security, military affairs, health, and geopolitics, as the Snowden leaks   made amply clear.

h)     Traders of technological determinism   like to argue that, with the advances in cloud and mobile computing, the   non-stop generation of data on a never-before scale is bound to change how   humans think, and therefore act and live.

i)     No doubt, there is overpowering business   logic to the rise and rise of big data analytics. But does this mean it   should get a leading role in the domain of politics and public policy? The   answer to this question may already have been decided, going by the frequency   with which evidence-based policy-making and actionable information pops up in   govt documents and the reports of bodies such as the United Nations or the World   Bank.

j)     India too is well and truly on board the   bandwagon. On the one hand, the large pool of English-speaking engineering/   mathematics graduates makes India an attractive destination for the   off-shoring of big data analytics. On the other hand, with several   citizen-to-govt transactions, it is clear that Big Data will come to play a   major role.

k)     Besides, many examples have been cited   to prove that big data can be harnessed for social good. We have been told   that cellphone call logs can help locate survivors during a natural disaster.   Online searches can yield data to predict a disease outbreak.

l)     The exponential growth of big data   analytics and its increasing utilisation in govt policy is premised on many   things, including growth in IT infrastructure, digital inclusion of those previously   excluded by poverty, and an overarching colonisation of the analog universe   by the digital.

m)     While evidence-based policy-making   may be good for business and the tech industry, it is only politics-driven   policy-making that can make a positive difference to peoples lives.

7.

Indias eye on universe ready for tests (Page 7)

a)     S&T

b)     Geography

a)     Astrosat

b)     Universe

c)     Galaxies

d)     ISRO

e)     Satish Dhawan Space Centre

a)     A fully assembled Astrosat (Indias first   space observatory) is ready for intensive tests before its launch around   October. ISRO said that the 1650-kg spacecraft would orbit Earth equatorially   at 650 km and study distant stars, galaxies, black holes and other cosmic   objects.

b)     The space-based observatory was built at   the ISRO Satellite Centre to operate for five years and will provide useful   data for countrys astronomy community. It will put India in an elite orbit   with the US, Europe, Russia and Japan.

c)     One of ISRO directors said Astrosat   would be the first such satellite to scan simultaneously the sky in most of   the frequency spectra from ultraviolet to optical and low and high energy   X-ray bands.

d)     In the coming days, Astrosat will undergo   a host of environmental tests - electromagnetic interference, electromagnetic   compatibility, thermal vacuum, vibration and acoustics and so on. Later, the   satellite will be shipped to the Satish Dhawan Space Centre for launch.

Branches

Ashok Nagar Branch
1-10-223/A, Sub-register office Line
Hyderabad
+91 9052 29 29 29, 9052 19 29 29

Madhapur Branch
Plot No.3, 2nd floor, Raghuma Towers
Hyderabad
+91 9052 492929

Delhi:
Old Rajendra Nagar

Send to mail

Request for call