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Daily News Analysis 12-06-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

India to attend Donors Conference in Nepal (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     PM Modi told his Nepalese counterpart Sushil Koirala that India will send a high-level ministerial delegation to the Donors Conference in Kathmandu on June 25.

2.

Govt plays down hot pursuit claims (Pages 1 and 10)

a)     I.R

b)     National

a)     Worried by Myanmars objections to the public accounts of the anti-terror operations against NSCN(K) militants, the Union govt backtracked on assertions that the Army went on a hot pursuit in the territory of the neighbouring country.

3.

Yunnan, W. Bengal the key drivers for BCIM (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     The Chinese Province of Yunnan and the Indian State of West Bengal (both seeking fresh business opportunities) are imparting a new dynamic to the formation of the Bangladesh-China-India-Myanmar economic corridor, which now appears to be finding greater support in India.

4.

Battling Islamic State (Page 8)

a)     International

a)     A year after it captured Mosul (the major Iraqi city), Islamic State remains a formidable force in the West Asian region.

5.

NJAC will involve civil society (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     The Centre said the National Judicial Appointments Commission is founded on the broad-based philosophy that leaders of civil society should also have a say in judicial appointments.

6.

Getting the climate story right (Page 9)

a)     National

b)     Environment

a)     In the next round of climate talks, Indias stand must be to strengthen its development needs while committing to bend the emissions curve downwards.

7.

India secures top-most ratings for financial market norms (Page 13)

a)     National

b)     Economy

a)     With the RBI and SEBI being rated better than their peers in China and US, Indias financial market regulatory framework got the top-most ratings from the global bodies of banking and capital market regulators.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

India to attend Donors Conference in Nepal (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Nepal relations

b)     Nepals earthquake

c)     Constitution of Nepal

a)    PM Modi told his Nepalese counterpart Sushil Koirala that India will send a high-level ministerial delegation to the Donors Conference in Kathmandu on June 25.

b)     Nepal had earlier turned down offers from several countries (including India) to host the conference. It has already set up a $2-billion fund for reconstruction and rebuilding.

c)   According to sources, Modi assured PM Koirala of Indias steady and sustained support to Nepal in its rehabilitation and reconstruction efforts, guided by the preference and priorities of the govt in Kathmandu.

d)     They also discussed recent political developments, including drafting of the Constitution in Nepal.

2.

Govt plays down hot pursuit claims (Pages 1 and 10)

a)     I.R

b)     National

a)     India – Myanmar relations

b)     Coutner-terrorism

c)     Manipur situation

d)     NSCN(K)

a)     Worried by Myanmars objections to public accounts of anti-terror operations against NSCN(K) militants, the Union govt backtracked on assertions that the Army went on a hot pursuit in the territory of the neighbouring country.

b)     Sources said that the Myanmar govt had conveyed its displeasure over statements from India about crossing into the neighbours territory to carry out an early-morning raid on terror camps.

c)     While the counter-terror operations were negotiated carefully by diplomats over the past few days (following the killing of 18 Army personnel in an ambush in Manipur), any indication that Myanmar govt allowed Indian soldiers into its territory would violate its Constitution.

3.

Yunnan, W. Bengal the key drivers for BCIM (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     Bangladesh-China-India-Myanmar (BCIM) economic corridor  

b)     China-India economic partnership

c)     Yunnan Province

d)     Guizhou Province

e)     Kakinada Special Economic Zone

 

a)      The Chinese Province of Yunnan and the Indian State of West Bengal (both seeking fresh business opportunities) are imparting a new dynamic to the formation of the BCIM economic corridor, which now appears to be finding greater support in India.

b)     Indias Ambassodor to China said that the Yunnan-West Bengal tie-up follows a similar initiative by Guizhou International, a Chinese company based in the Province of Guizhou that is investing in a $3.5-billion project in the Kakinada Special Economic Zone in Andhra Pradesh.

c)     Minister of State for External Affairs V.K. Singh also pointed out that the BCIM initiative was in sync with Indias thrust on accelerated development of infrastructure, which included construction of railways, industrial corridors and smart cities.

d)     He stressed that successful emergence of flagship projects was now necessary to change public perceptions about China-India economic partnership.

e)     Chinese official said that unlike the past, when Myanmar and Bangladesh (along with China) had shown greater enthusiasm, the dynamic was now changing. India (in partnership with Beijing) was showing signs of leading way to the development of the BCIM.

4.

Battling Islamic State (Page 8)

a)     International

a)     Islamic State (IS)

b)     Syria and Iraq crisis

c)     US-led anti-IS coalition

d)     Mosul

e)     Tikrit

f)     Damascus

g)     Ramadi

h)     Palmyra

 

a)     A year after it captured Mosul (the major Iraqi city), IS remains a formidable force in the West Asian region. US-led coalitions bombing campaign shows no sign of checking its momentum.

b)     Barring some setbacks suffered at the hands of Kurdish and Shia militias, IS has expanded its zone of influence beyond its base in Syraq over the year. It recently captured Ramadi (the capital of Iraqs Anbar province) and the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. It now has branches in countries including Lebanon, Libya, Afghanistan and Nigeria.

c)     To be sure, IS has no dearth of enemies in battlefield. The Syrian and Iraqi armies have declared war on it; Gulf monarchies are a party to a US-led coalition bombing IS locations; Egypt had struck IS militants in Libya and Hezbollah (the Lebanese Shia militia) has said it would fight IS along the Lebanon-Syria border.

d)     ISs advantage perhaps is that its rivals have no coordinated strategy - they are driven not by a common goal of defeating the enemy but by their own self-interest and sectarian calculations.

e)     In Syria, the regime of Bashar al Assad is the most potent force against IS. But the US and its allies such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar want a regime change in Damascus. The efforts of Saudi Arabia and Turkey to weaken the Syrian regime are helping IS grow.

f)     The Hezbollah may be able to protect the Lebanese-Syrian border from IS, but it is considered a terrorist outfit by US, and an Iranian lackey by Saudis. The Kurdish guerrillas in the Syrian and Turkish border regions had resisted IS effectively, but Turkey does not want them to be brought into the anti-IS coalition.

g)     IS feeds off this complex sectarian-geopolitical game, and with cruelty and extremism tightens its grip over victims. But all this does not mean IS is powerful - it could be defeated, as Kobane and Tikrit show. But to turn such isolated victories into a comprehensive victory, the forces battling IS need to come up with a cohesive strategy cutting across sectarian fault-lines. Until that happens, West Asia will continue to see more bloodshed.

5.

NJAC will involve civil society (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     National Judicial Appointments Commission (NJAC)

b)     Collegium system

c)     Right to Information (RTI) Act

d)     Supreme Court

e)     High Court

f)     Attorney General

a)     The Centre said the NJAC is founded on the broad-based philosophy that leaders of civil society should also have a say in judicial appointments.

b)     The Centre responded by questioning the Collegium systems wisdom that only judges possess the temperament and know-how to recommend persons for judicial appointments, and justified the role of two eminent persons (who represent civil society) on the six-member NJAC panel.

c)     The court also asked whether the govt (by making details of judicial appointments accountable under the RTI Act) is unnecessarily giving reasons to defame rejected applicants.

d)     To this, Attorney General said the finer aspects of disclosure of information would be worked out eventually, but this worry cannot compromise the NJACs commitment to transparency as a public body acting for the greater good.

6.

Getting the climate story right (Page 9)

a)     National

b)     Environment

a)     Climate change

b)     Carbon emissions

c)     Paris Climate talks

d)     United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

e)     Copenhagen summit

a)     In what has been a marathon year for climate talks, negotiators have been meeting for last two weeks to prepare a 2015 Agreement to be signed at UNFCCC in Paris in December. In this round of negotiations, the focus lies on what each country places on negotiating table in Paris as its national contribution to addressing climate change. 

b)     India has been correctly arguing that contributions should include measures to adapt to climate change and the provision of finance and technology to developing countries, but what will most closely be watched are efforts to reduce greenhouse gases.

c)     For each country to self-determine its national contribution is a curious approach. The obvious incentive for any country is to place a limited and costless proposal on the table. There are two counter pressures - from strong domestic constituencies for aggressive climate action; and (more important for India) international pressure through naming and shaming.

d)     The EU has committed at least 40 percent reduction in emissions from 1990 levels by 2030, which it states is a substantial step up from its 2020 targets. US contribution appears far more modest - a reduction of 26-28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025. China has provided hints of its contribution and is expected to announce it this month - it will peak emissions by 2030 at an unstated level.

e)     It is in Indias interest to signal serious intent, both because it wishes to project itself as a responsible global actor and because, as a nation that is deeply vulnerable to climate impacts, an effective global climate agreement is firmly in its own interest.

f)     India is a rapidly growing economy, starting from a low economic base. Its per capita emissions are a third of global average, and between a quarter and a sixth of those of other emerging economies; it needs carbon headroom to grow. But the twist is that because it is a rapidly transforming society and economy, it is impossible to predict future emissions equivalent with its needs.

g)     India is in the early stage of three transformations - a demographic transition for which its needs to create jobs; a shift from a rural to an at least half-urban society; and vastly expanded infrastructure to support both transitions. None of these factors are true to the same extent in other emerging economies. Successfully negotiating all of these transformations requires energy, which means uncertain but higher future carbon emissions.

h)     Given these factors, it would be careless to place a cap on Indias carbon headroom. This point is validated by recent analyses from the Centre for Policy Research. The report found that seven recent Indian energy and climate models predict anywhere from a doubling to a tripling of Indias carbon dioxide emissions from now until 2030. While there may be some technical scope to narrow this range, there is an uncertainty about the future that leads to such a wide band.

i)     However, India will need to provide some commitments as an upgrade on its Copenhagen commitment, which was to reduce economys carbon intensity 20-25 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. While intensity numbers are also hard to predict because they involve computing future carbon emissions and GDP growth, adding 10-15 percent reduction in intensity by 2030 is a likely safe statement.

j)     Therefore, the second step is to demonstrate how India is willing to go much further and put on the table a more substantial contribution to global mitigation action. The key argument is that for a rapidly transforming economy like India, early and certain actions that bend the curve of emissions downward, so that emissions increase at a slower rate, are a far more valuable climate contribution than uncertain future actions.

k)     Third, this vision has to be given concrete shape through specific immediate actions that would bend the emissions curve. To develop these actions requires careful sector-by-sector assessment of the scope for co-benefits. Here also, India has a strong track record, particularly in areas such as energy efficiency, where several policy, legal, and institutional changes have reshaped investment incentives toward greater energy efficiency.

l)     Together, this three-step package provides a compelling story for Indian action that is both a strong contribution to the global effort and rightly highlights the countrys development needs. In 2015, the climate game is not just about numbers but also about the story. If India does not frame the benchmarks by which it wishes to be judged, others will do it and to its harm.

7.

India secures top-most ratings for financial market norms (Page 13)

a)     National

b)     Economy

a)     Financial market norms

b)     Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI)

c)     RBI

d)     Principles for Financial Market Infrastructure (PFMIs)

a)     With RBI and SEBI being rated better than their peers in China and US, Indias financial market regulatory framework got top-most ratings from the global bodies of banking and capital market regulators.

b)     In the latest global assessment study of regulatory framework for financial market infrastructures across the world, only six countries (including India) have got highest score of 4 for all 8 parameters on a scale of one to four. The other five countries are Australia, Brazil, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore.

c)     The annual assessment studies the implementation status of international PFMIs in various countries. These PFMIs work as global standards for the financial sector entities across world and have been finalised by International Organisation of Securities Commissions and the Bank for International Settlements.

d)     The study showed that SEBI and RBI have put in place all necessary regulations for the PFMIs, while they also have a legal capacity to implement the responsibilities outlined under these global standards.

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