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Daily News Analysis 16-06-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

India signs motor vehicle pact with three nations (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     India signed a motor vehicles agreement with three SAARC nations (Bhutan, Bangladesh and Nepal) that expects seamless transit of passenger and cargo vehicles among these countries.

2.

Homeless, no longer (Page 9)

a)     I.R

b)     Social issue

a)     The rising state-enclave relationship is empowering, and will help the enclave residents negotiate their rights with the people who have exploited them for decades.

3.

Greece talks collapse (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     Greece tried to drag loan talks with its EU-IMF creditors back from the edge after negotiations collapsed over the weekend and left the country just two weeks away from a catastrophic default on its debt.

4.

Chronicles of the Stateless (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     In 2003, for the first time since the World War II, the number of those forcibly displaced from their homes exceeded 50 million. Millions more have since been displaced as a result of conflict and crises around globe.

5.

The tortuous road to Naga peace (Page 8)

a)     National

a)     The publicity that surrounds the success of Indias cross-border strike against rebels in Myanmar cannot hide the fact that the real failure of Indian intelligence was not in predicting the possible spot of the attack but in anticipating the emergence of a rebel coalition in the jungles of Myanmar Naga civil society groups.

6.

Keep pleas in abeyance, says Centre (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Solicitor-General Ranjit Kumar asked the Supreme Court to keep petitions challenging the constitutionality of the NJAC law in suspension for five years.

7.

Dip in WPI-inflation continues (Pg 13)

a)     Economy

a)     Wholesale Price Index inflation was -2.36 percent in May (marking the seventh consecutive month in which it has been negative), compared to -2.65 percent in April.

8.

ISRO to test re-usable satellitelaunch vehicle in Sept (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     S&T

a)     In a major technology demonstration ultimately aimed at cutting down the cost of satellite launches to one-tenth the present rates, the ISRO will flight test an indigenously developed re-usable satellite launch vehicle for the first time this September.

9.

Britain celebrates 800 years of Magna Carta (Page 7)

a)     International

b)     History

a)     Royalty returned to Runnymede 800 years after a group of rebellious nobles forced a medieval king to put his seal on a historic document (Magna Carta) that established the foundations of parliamentary democracy, human rights and the supremacy of law.

10.

Eight tourist spots to be adopted by corporates (Pg 6)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     8 tourist spots will now be adopted by top corporate companies. These include Ranganathittu Bird Sanctuary, Belur and Halebid and Venkatappa Art Gallery.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

India signs motor vehicle pact with three nations (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     India – SAARC nations relations

b)     Motor vehicles agreement

c)     SAARC

a)     India signed a motor vehicles agreement with three SAARC nations (Bhutan, Bangladesh and Nepal) that expects seamless transit of passenger and cargo vehicles among these countries.

b)     The agreement will not only reduce transport costs, but also enhance multi-modal transport and transit facilities, enabling increased connectivity and promotion of greater trade among the four countries.

c)     As per the agreement, the four countries will carry out a six-month work plan from July for the implementation of the BBIN MVA in accordance with preparation of bilateral (perhaps trilateral or quadrilateral) agreements and protocols, installation of the preconditions for implementing the approved agreements, among others.

d)     A similar motor agreement with Myanmar and Thailand is on the cards.

2.

Homeless, no longer (Page 9)

a)     I.R

b)     Social issue

a)     India – Bangladesh relations

b)     Land Boundary Agreement (LBA)

c)     Border Security Force (BSF)

d)     Mosaldanga

a)     On May 7, a day after India and Bangladesh signed the historic LBA, the residents of Mosaldanga (a hamlet in south Cooch Behar district of West Bengal) marched down the main market. People in Mosaldanga are among the 50,000 stateless people of East Bangladesh who (after Indias independence) got cut off from both East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) and India, confined to fragments of land belonging to neither country. 

b)     In an accident of geography, about 51 parcels of Bangladeshi land stayed on the Indian side (known as Bangladeshi enclaves) but with all roads leading to Bangladesh either fenced with concertina wires or guarded by BSF. And across the border, Bangladesh was left with 111 enclaves with Indian citizens and no access to India.

c)     After four decades of hesitating, the problem has been finally resolved, with enclave dwellers on both sides now allowed to choose which of the two countries they want to belong to. On the Indian side, the Bangladeshis have decided to become Indian citizens. They consider this a milestone of freedom and worth a thousand celebrations.

d)     Prior to the agreement, the Indian govt viewed the enclaves as foreign territories, where Indian law was inapplicable and where criminals settled for years to avoid police arrests. The polices appearance in Mosaldanga this time sent out a strong message to the residents that the law had finally been established in the enclaves. For the first time, these stateless people today feel that they belong to India and India belongs to them.

e)     The transition from being Bangladeshi to holding an Indian identity will dismantle several oppressive structures that reproduce the lawlessness. Indian citizenship will make the enclaves residents equal players in local politics and economy.

f)     The rising state-enclave relationship is empowering and will help the enclave residents negotiate their rights with the people who have exploited them for decades. But its hard to foresee that change taking place smoothly - the violence in Mosaldanga is evidence of the fact that the people who illicitly benefited from the enclaves are very angered and peace will not be granted so quickly.

g)     By 2014, the West Bengal CM had changed her stance from being critical of merging the enclaves with the Indian mainland, she endorsed the settlement bill passed by the Indian Parliament in May 2015.

h)     On June 6, PM Modi and Bangladesh PM Sheikh Hasina signed the historic deal. The govt has now signed contracts for laying roads, drainage systems, and building hospitals and schools. An initial investment of Rs. 174.98 crore has been charted out. In addition, existing govt schemes for housing, sanitation and agriculture are set to be implemented shortly.

3.

Greece talks collapse (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     Greece debt crisis

b)     European Union (EU)

c)     IMF

a)     Greece tried to drag loan talks with its EU-IMF creditors back from the edge after negotiations collapsed over the weekend and left the country just two weeks away from a catastrophic default on its debt.

b)     PM Alexis govt has been locked in negotiations with Greeces creditors (EU and the IMF) for five months, in hopes of securing release of remaining €7.2 billion in rescue funds. But an EU spokeswoman said the EU and IMF have already made major concessions to Greece.

c)   Greeces €240 billion bailout expires on June 30 and to meet that deadline, a reform deal must be resolved by a meeting in Luxembourg of eurozones 19 Finance Ministers, who control the purse strings of the rescue programme.

4.

Chronicles of the Stateless (Page 12)

a)     International

a)     Refugee Convention

b)     Syria crisis

c)     Dadaab   

 

a)     In 2003, for the first time since the World War II, the number of those forcibly displaced from their homes exceeded 50 million. Millions more have since been displaced as a result of conflict and crises around the globe.

b)     86 percent of the worlds refugees are in developing countries. Turkey, Lebanon and Pakistan each host more than 1 million refugees. 1 million refugees need resettlement or other forms of humanitarian admission.

c)     145 countries have ratified the Refugee Convention, but most nations in West Asia and some in South Asia and Southeast Asia have not. In these countries, refugees enjoy limited rights and in some cases cannot even be legally recongnised as refugees.

d)     In Africa, people are escaping conflict and oppression in countries like South Sudan, the Central African Republic, Nigeria and Burundi. There are an estimated three million refugees in sub-Saharan Africa. Kenya is home to Dadaab (the worlds largest refugee camp) set up in 1991.

e)     In Syria, 4 million women, men and children have escaped the country following the civil war, making this one of biggest refugee crises in history. 95 percent of them are living in the countries neighbouring Syria, including Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon.

5.

The tortuous road to Naga peace (Page 8)

a)     National

a)     Naga peace process

b)     Manipur attack

c)     National Socialist Council of Nagalim (Isaac-Muivah) (NSCN)

d)     NSCN(K)

e)     United National Liberation Front of West South East Asia (UNLFWSEA)

f)     United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA)

g)     National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB)

h)     Peoples Liberation Army (PLA)

a)     After the June 4 attack in Manipur that left at least 20 soldiers of the Indian Armys 6 Dogra Regiment dead when suspected militants attacked their convoy in Chandel district bordering Myanmar in Manipur, the attention is back on the long, complex and uncertain Naga peace process.

b)     Since the leaders of NSCN (Isaac-Muivah) signed ceasefire with H.D. Deve Gowda govt in 1997 and started negotiations, the peace talks have gone on and on, with round after round of inconclusive negotiations. There were suggestions recently that a final solution might be in sight and that may have caused those left out of the process into striking back.

c)     The total duration of these negotiations does point to the complexities involved in trying to settle the Naga insurgency, but many critics of the Indian decision-making process have also suggested that New Delhi is trying to wear down the rebel leaders in a battle of attrition since the limited tactical advantages of keeping the Naga rebels off the battlefield have been achieved by the ceasefire.

d)     Some have also said that the ceasefire and the political dialogue have helped India further divide the Naga rebels, pointing to the talks with the Muivah faction and the refusal to talk with the Khaplang faction despite a ceasefire with his group. Many would say that is what finally caused Khaplang to renounce on the ceasefire and form the rebel coalition, the UNLFWSEA, with diverse rebel factions like the ULFA (Independent), the NDFB (Songjibit) and KLA (Jibon).

e)     Like Khaplangs faction, these other groups are splinters of the original movements. Khaplang was under pressure for the last few years from New Delhi for providing shelter to these other Northeast Indian rebel groups. On the other hand, the Myanmarese Naga rebel leader has seen his Indian Naga comrades break away to form splinter groups with whom India has promptly signed or negotiated a ceasefire.

f)     Khaplang on the warpath again is partly dictated by his urge to end his isolation in the jungles of Myanmar, if only to remind New Delhi that he cannot be ignored - a point he seeks to make by getting together all those in Northeast who still intend to fight India.

g)     The other factions which have joined up with Khaplang in UNLFWSEA are also diverse groups capable of occasional hits here and there. But it is the working relations of UNLFWSEA with powerful Meitei rebel groups like UNLF and the PLA that makes anti-India platform in Myanmars  jungles such a worrying proposition for New Delhi.

h)     So, the real failure of Indian intelligence was not in predicting the possible spot of the attack but in anticipating the emergence of a rebel coalition in the jungles of Myanmar. The first step in that direction was taken by Khaplang when he signed a ceasefire agreement with Myanmars Thein Sein govt, one of the 14 rebel groups in Myanmar to strike a ceasefire deal with it.

i)     The second phase of forming that coalition was in extensive negotiations between the constituents. Now, reports about these negotiations have been flowing out of Myanmar off and on. They have been reported in the Northeast Indian media but not picked by the big media guns in faraway Delhi.

j)     Then came the actual breakdown of the ceasefire but New Delhi was not concerned because it felt the Myanmarese  Naga rebel leader had been isolated and confined to his lair in the jungles of Myanmar. They underestimated his strike power on Indian soil.

k)     The Indian reply after the rebel violence has also been hasty and ill-conceived. The Indian Army was under pressure from top decision makers to hit back immediately, to make a political point of a strong India which will not tolerate terrorism. 

l)     The Nagaland CM T.R. Zeliang said that the Centre has never kept his govt in picture over the breakdown of ceasefire with Khaplang. He said it was possible to have reasoned with Khaplang through Naga civil society against breaking off the ceasefire. After 60 years of brutal conflict, the Nagas have got used to the peace dividend since 1997.

m)    But involving the States in the complex peace negotiations like those with the Naga rebel factions is yet to become a feature of PM Modis cooperative federalism. As the leaks after the transborder raids into Myanmar seem to indicate, the govt is keen on greater secrecy in peacemaking than in war-making.

6.

Keep pleas in abeyance, says Centre (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     National Judicial Appointment Commission (NJAC) law  

b)     Collegium system

c)     Article 124 of the Constitution

d)     Supreme Court

e)     High Court

f)     CJI

g)     Solicitor General

h)     Attorney General

a)     Solicitor-General Ranjit Kumar asked Supreme Court to keep petitions challenging the constitutionality of NJAC law in suspension for five years.

b)     This suggestion comes a day after Attorney-General Rohatgi concluded his arguments for Centre. Rohatgi had said NJAC eliminated the cover of mystery over judicial appointments and shows in an age of transparency.

c)     During the day-long hearing, Kumar stressed that striking down NJAC would not bring Collegium back and the judiciary would have to wait till Parliament fills the vacuum by enacting a new law.

d)     He was trying to respond to the opinion voiced by a five-judge Constitution Bench led by Justice Khehar that if the amended Article 124 of the Constitution is struck down, the Collegium will spring back to life.

7.

Dip in WPI-inflation continues (Page 13)

a)     Economy

a)      Wholesale Price Index (WPI) inflation

b)     Food inflation

c)     Consumer Price Index (CPI)

d)     Inflation

e)     Monetary policy

f)     RBI

g)     Urjit Patel report

h)     Monsoon

i)     India Meteorological Department (IMD)

 

a)     WPI inflation was -2.36 percent in May (marking the seventh consecutive month in which it has been negative), compared to -2.65 percent in April. Food inflation remained positive at 3.8 percent. However, the consensus among analysts is that this will not induce RBI to cut rates further.

b)     The continued contraction in WPI was due to broad-based factors, with the three main components of the index-primary articles, fuel and power, and manufactured products – all trending negative.

c)     Food inflation (which was a concern due to the IMDs prediction of a deficient monsoon) was lower than feared.

d)     Though monsoon has been predicted to be below normal this year, the Govt has already outlined its preparedness and plan of action to deal with any contingency on this account. This should ensure keeping in check any pressure on inflation arising from the food segment.

e)     The monetary policy agreement between the Ministry of Finance and RBI, as well as the Urjit Patel report has argued that inflation target/objective should be based on the CPI.

8.

ISRO to test re-usable satellite launch vehicle in Sept (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     S&T

a)    Re-usable satellite launch vehicles  

b)     Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS)

c)     ISRO

a)     In a major technology demonstration ultimately aimed at cutting down the cost of satellite launches to one-tenth the present rates, the ISRO will flight test an indigenously developed re-usable satellite launch vehicle for the first time this September.

b)     Under the project, a plane will be flown into outer space at five times the speed of sound, deliver the payload and then land back like an aircraft. At present, the various stages in a satellite launch vehicle fall off in succession during launch and cannot be reused, making such launches expensive.

c)     Official said 11 satellites were launched in the last one year and by next year IRNSS would be operationalised. It will be only the third such system in the world.

9.

Britain celebrates 800 years of Magna Carta (Page 7)

a)     International

b)     History

a)     Magna Carta

a)     Royalty returned to Runnymede 800 years after a group of rebellious nobles forced a medieval king to put his seal on a historic document (Magna Carta) that established foundations of parliamentary democracy, human rights and the supremacy of law.

b)     The story of the British monarchy is intertwined with that of Runnymede and Magna Carta. The values of Magna Carta are not just important to UK and Commonwealth, but across the world. Its principles are significant and enduring.

c)     Magna Carta (or the Great Charter) has formed a cornerstone of fundamental liberties over eight centuries.

10.

Eight tourist spots to be adopted by corporates (Page 6)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     Biodiversity

b)     Ranganathittu Bird Sanctuary

c)      Belur, Halebid and Venkatappa Art Gallery

 

a)    Eight tourist spots will now be adopted by top corporate companies. These include Ranganathittu Bird Sanctuary, Belur and Halebid and Venkatappa Art Gallery in Kanrnataka.

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