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Daily News Analysis 22-09-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

In New York, India to flag external source of terror (Pages1,12)

a)     I.R

a)     As PM Modi visits US to attend the UNGA, India is likely to tell international forum that there are hardly any cases of Indians joining the violent pan-Islamist groups.

2.

India has to homogenise liability law, says GE chief (P 1,12)

a)     I.R

a)     General Electric CEO said that unless an agreement is reached with the US on common language on the civil nuclear liability law, General Electric will not invest in Indias nuclear energy industry.

3.

Ahead of UN meet, India sends tough message to Pakistan, China (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     With the LoC, IB, LAC in Jammu and Kashmir witnessing hot postures by Pakistan and China, Home Minister Rajnath Singh made it clear that the neighbours should stop promoting terrorism, infiltration and desist from provocative actions such as border transgressions for better relations with India.

4.

India calls Ambassador back for consultations (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     Deeply concerned over the continuing violence in Nepal, and the impact of Kathmandus decision to adopt the new Constitution despite Indias advice, the Ministry of External Affairs called Indian Ambassador to Nepal Ranjit Rae back to Delhi for consultations.

5.

Constitution sans consensus (Page 10)

a)     International

a)     Eight years after the adoption of an interim Constitution that heralded a peace process, Nepal has finally managed to promulgate a Constitution.

6.

UN defends silence on genocide in Sri Lanka war crimes report (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     The Office of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has defended the findings of its report on alleged war crimes in Sri Lanka, which drew criticism from several quarters for its silence on genocide in the island nation.

7.

Preparing for the climate exiles (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     The poorest and most vulnerable people (forced to move as result of climate change) will have no legal standing under the United Nations Refugee Convention.

8.

Pak. may join anti-IS coalition (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Pakistan is considering a US request to join a multinational coalition against IS terror group, which has become most formidable threat to peace after al-Qaeda.

9.

Tsipras in PM saddle for second time this year (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Alexis Tsipras was elected as PM for the second time this year but with a strikingly different mandate.

10.

Respond to pleas for release of Netaji files: SC (Page 13)

a)     National

a)     Calling Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose an excellent person and showing reluctance initially to intervene in attempts to unravel the mystery behind his disappearance in 1945, the Supreme Court asked the Ministry of Home Affairs and the Prime Ministers Office to reply swiftly to a Supreme Court advocates requests for de-classification of confidential files on Netaji.

11.

Plea against death sentence for 7/11 blasts convicts (Page 13)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Arguing against the death sentence, the defence in the July 11 2006 Mumbai train bombings case said that the 12 convicted accused in the case committed offence under duress and the possibility of an iota of doubt about the evidence could act as mitigating circumstances.

12.

Growth to top last years, China hit minimal: FM (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)    Finance Minister Arun Jaitley said he hopes the economy will grow faster this year than last, and expects that Asias third-largest economy will not see a big hit from Chinas slowdown.

13.

Bhavani Island waits for Singapore touch (Page 7)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)    The picturesque Bhavani Island in river Krishna is considered a prized possession of the Tourism Department in Andhra Pradesh but the scenic spot has never got the recognition it deserves.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

In New York, India to flag external source of terror (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     India – US relations

b)    UNGA

c)     Terrorism

d)     Islamic State (IS)

e)     Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism

 

a)     As PM Modi visits US to attend the UNGA, India is likely to tell international forum that there are hardly any cases of Indians joining the violent pan-Islamist groups.

b)     Though a direct reference to the militant organisation (the IS) will be avoided, sources said India is likely to highlight the fact that the source of terrorism faced by India is often outside the country.

c)     Modi will address the Sustainable Development Summit at the UNGA on Sept 25. External Affairs Minister Sushma is already in the US and she will deliver Indias statement in the General Debate in the morning session of the UNGA on October 1.

d)    Official said that India also wants draft on Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism to be finalised. India has adopted a calibrated response to violent extremism that prevents disproportionate use of force by the govt. There are only a few instances of Indians joining extremist groups like the IS.

e)  The govt has been extremely cautious in dealing with the threat posed by the IS and has at all forums said that the group was not a threat to India.

2.

India has to homogenise liability law, says GE chief (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     India – US relations

b)     India – US civil nuclear deal

c)     Indias Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Act 2010

 

a)     General Electric CEO Jeff Immelt said that unless an agreement is reached with US on common language on civil nuclear liability law, General Electric will not invest in Indias nuclear energy industry.

b)   He also said GE (the worlds largest infrastructure company with a revenue of $146 billion in 2012-13) would like to see the reforms Modi has initiated to continue. He said subsidies in the electricity sector should be lowered so that prices were more market-determined.

c)     He said that the country could have fuel independence but prices paid for natural gas are too low for investments.

3.

Ahead of UN meet, India sends tough message to Pakistan, China (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Pakistan relations

b)     India – China relations

c)     Terrorism

d)     Line of Control (LoC)

e)     International Border (IB)

f)     Line of Actual Control (LAC)

g)     UNGA

a)     With the LoC, IB, LAC in J&K witnessing hot postures by Pakistan and China, Home Minister Rajnath Singh made it clear that the neighbours should stop promoting terrorism, infiltration and desist from provocative actions such as border transgressions for better relations with India.

b)     He also struck a conciliatory note, saying peace and prosperity in the Asian continent cannot prevail until Indias relations with Pakistan and China are harmonious.

c)     He said it has always been our endeavour to have friendly relations with neighbours. We have extended our hand of friendship to Pakistan and China. He added that Pakistan should come forward with zeal. India is ready to take the lead.

d)     The statement can bring a much-awaited thaw in relations after NSAs meeting in August was called off over invitation to separatists. His remarks also assume significance as PM Modi and his Pakistan counterpart Nawaz Sharif are heading to the US to attend the UNGA session soon, with no proposal to meet so far.

4.

India calls Ambassador back for consultations (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Nepal relations

b)     Nepals new Constitution

a)     Deeply concerned over the continuing violence in Nepal, and the impact of Kathmandus decision to adopt the new Constitution despite Indias advice, the Ministry of External Affairs called Indian Ambassador to Nepal Ranjit Rae back to Delhi for consultations.

b)     In its third and most stern statement in three days on the situation in Nepal, the MEA said it had repeatedly cautioned the political leadership of Nepal to take urgent steps to defuse the tension in the Terai region.

c)     The Ambassadors visit and MEA statement come a day after Nepal promulgated its Constitution. India has refused to welcome it, with officials saying that the decision had put a strain on bilateral ties.

d)     India says it has expressed its concerns to Nepals govt because of a possible spill-over of violence to the districts of Bihar bordering Nepal.

e)     But Indias concerns are not limited to just the fear of violence spreading to parts of Bihar. Since 2007, when the Seven Party alliance had first signed on to the Constitution-building process, India has been a key influence, even playing guarantor for many of parties.

f)     Officials say none of the commitments given by Nepal govt then on representation and rights of the Madhesi people were kept when the Constitution was finalised, and India feels slighted by this.

5.

Constitution sans consensus (Page 10)

a)     International

a)     Nepals new Constitution

b)     Constituent Assembly (CA)

c)     Nepali Congress

d)     Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist-Leninist)

e)     Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)

a)     Eight years after adoption of an interim Constitution that heralded a peace process, Nepal has finally managed to promulgate a Constitution. The path to becoming a secular, federal, democratic and republican Nepal (as the Constitution envisages it to be) was tortuous, and it could not be concluded on the basis of a consensus among the elected legislators in the CA.

b)     But it has moved Nepal significantly and in a progressive manner away from the 1990 Constitution that maintained the state as a constitutional monarchy ruled by a Hindu king.

c)     For one, the promulgation happened even as violent protests raged in Terai against injustice meted out to the Madhesis. The protestors were upset that federal restructuring of Nepal into seven provinces left the Madhesis divided among 5 provinces, with only one of them having a majority of plains-origin people.

d)     Clearly, the lack of consensus in the run-up to the promulgation will remain a political sticking point in the restructuring process. The leaders of the 3 main political parties (the Nepali Congress, the Communist Party of Nepal and the Unified Communist Party of Nepal) have affirmed that the federal boundaries could be changed later.

e)     There were also other reasons for discontent over the new Constitution. These include the delineation of electoral constituencies in Terai (where more than 50 percent of Nepals people live) which has not been done on the basis of the population in the plains; this creates a grievance about gerrymandering.

f)     Other complaints relate to citizenship norms that disallow children of Nepali mothers married to foreigners from inheriting Nepali citizenship. All said, the people of Nepal would be somewhat relieved that there has been a degree of closure to the Constitution-writing process.

g)     The polity could do well to take necessary constitutional steps to address the Madhesi concerns and to live up to these expectations on governance.

6.

UN defends silence on genocide in Sri Lanka war crimes report (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Sri Lankas human rights issue

b)     UNHRC

c)     LTTE

d)     Eelam war

 

a)     The Office of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has defended the findings of its report on alleged war crimes in Sri Lanka, which drew criticism from several quarters for its silence on genocide in the island nation.

b)     In February, Sri Lankas Northern Provincial Council passed a resolution, blaming successive governments in the country of committing genocide against Tamils.

c)     However, criticising report on different counts, including that of relying on the testimony of people whose identity has been kept confidential, former Foreign Minister of Sri Lanka G.L. Peiris argued that the purported evidence (on which critical findings are based) is shrouded in secrecy.

d)     He contended that Sri Lanka had every opportunity to use well-established principles of international humanitarian and human rights law, applied with reasonable uniformity in precedents across the globe, to make a cogent case for the protection of the military personnel.

7.

Preparing for the climate exiles (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     Refugee crisis

b)     United Nations Refugee Convention

c)     Climate change

d)     United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

e)     Greenhouse gas (GHG)

f)     Sea level rise (SLR)

g)     Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS)

h)     Low Elevation Coastal Zones (LECZ)

 

a)    Although firm numbers are not available, reports suggest that more than 4,00,000 people have arrived at the EU border so far this year, driven by wars and conflicts in places such as Syria, Afghanistan and Eritrea.

b)     Disasters such as intense storms and heat waves and slow moving changes like droughts and sea level rise are expected to exacerbate living conditions to such an extent that people could be forced to move from their homes and become climate exiles. Many may be forced to move into neighbouring, more protective spaces in the same country or perhaps across national borders.

c)     For example, consider atoll nations in the Pacific such as Tuvalu or the Maldives in the Indian Ocean. With an elevation of only a few metres above sea level, these islands will suffer the worst effects of storms and flooding and may be partly or entirely submerged by even a couple of metres of SLR.

d)     While the population of these small island states is relatively small, people will have to leave their country without a viable nation state. Those forced to move in this manner have no legal standing under the UN Refugee Convention, which offers protection only for those who have been forced to leave their country due to well-grounded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion.

e)     Worst of all, the people most affected by these changes will be among the poorest and most vulnerable. Their own nations contributions to GHG concentrations in atmosphere are relatively trivial, but they would suffer some of the most severe effects. It is no surprise then that AOSIS has called for global action to limit warming to 1.5 degree Celsius, as opposed to the general focus on a 2 degree Celsius limit.

f)     Low-lying delta regions of the world such as those of the Irrawaddy and the Ganges-Brahmaputra are also vulnerable to effects of SLR. More than a tenth of humanity resides in vulnerable regions of the world that are within 10 metres of todays sea level, also known as LECZ. Close to half of Bangladesh lies in the LECZ and these areas will be severely affected by rising seas.

g)     Anticipating these changes with rising temperature, it is important that we prepare to address these issues instead of building fortress-like nations. Regional agreements, joint action, training and skills, sharing of knowledge, technologies, lessons from successes and failures to adapt should all be part of a regional focus in preparing for SLR. Labour agreements are especially important and should be combined with skill building and training in advance of migration.

h) UNFCCC has acknowledged a domain referred to as Loss and Damage, which essentially tries to capture these types of inability to cope with the effects of warming. This is distinct from mitigation, or reducing GHG emissions, and adaptation, or finding ways to live in a warmer world. At the Conference of Parties (COP19) of the UNFCCC (held in Warsaw in 2013), all parties agreed to set up a new mechanism on L&D.

i)     The issue is important because even after GHG emissions are reduced and communities adapt to climate change, there would still be loss and damage to people, livelihoods and infrastructure as a result of their inability to cope with climate change. Loss generally refers to the complete forfeiture of items like land, ecosystems, or of human lives, while damage refers to the harm to infrastructure and property that could be repaired. The term includes both economic and non-economic losses.

j)   In order to gain traction, this issue needs support from rich countries (Annex-1 countries in UN parlance). The term L&D has (at any rate) come to imply liability and compensation, which makes it particularly challenging for rich countries, which are responsible for the bulk of the GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. It is still not clear if L&D will figure at all in the negotiations and whether it would then be part of the core agreement at Paris.

k)     The Loss and Damage mechanism is up for review in 2016 and developing countries want to ensure that it is part of the core agreement in Paris, so that its centrality is established. This is why developing countries are fighting tooth and nail to ensure L&D figures in the core agreement.

l)     The refugee crisis in Europe reminds us that the Paris agreement needs to be wider than just the reduction of greenhouse gases, or mitigation. The text of recently concluded meeting of Like Minded Developing Countries in Delhi states that the issues for Paris COP are mitigation, adaptation, finance, capacity building, technology development and transfer, transparency of action and support as well as L&D.

m)    Acknowledging and acting on these issues would help prevent the kind of crisis we are now seeing in Europe in future as a result of climate change.

8.

Pak. may join anti-IS coalition (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Islamic State (IS)

b)     Syria and Iraq crisis

c)     Al-Qaeda

a)     Pakistan is considering a US request to join a multinational coalition against IS terror group, which has become most formidable threat to peace after al-Qaeda.

b)     IS has seized hundreds of square miles in Iraq and Syria. But both civil and military leadership is in a fix as joining the coalition will bring domestic backlash.

c)     Official said that Pakistan is also wary of possible reaction from Saudi Arabia as Islamabad refused to join a coalition led by Riyadh in Yemen.

d)     The government sources said that by joining the new coalition, Pakistan can expect that monetary assistance from the so-called Coalition Support Funds to continue to flow, which otherwise is likely to be stopped after 2015.

9.

Tsipras in PM saddle for second time this year (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Greece debt crisis

a)     Alexis Tsipras was elected as PM for the second time this year but with a strikingly different mandate. Instead of the vehemently anti-austerity platform he espoused in January, he has now agreed to implement yet more stringent spending cuts and tax hikes.

b)    The handling of the bailout a 3-year 86-billion euro ($97 billion) package of rescue loans and its accompanying austerity measures is likely to be the new governments biggest test.  

10.

Respond to pleas for release of Netaji files: SC (Page 13)

a)     National

 

a)     Subhas Chandra Bose issue

b)     Indian National Army (INA)

c)     Freedom struggle

a)     Calling Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose an excellent person and showing reluctance initially to intervene in attempts to unravel the mystery behind his disappearance in 1945, the Supreme Court asked the Ministry of Home Affairs and the PMO to reply swiftly to a Supreme Court advocates requests for de-classification of confidential files on Netaji.

11.

Plea against death sentence for 7/11 blasts convicts (Page 13)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Death penalty

b)     MCOCA court

c)     Mumbai train bombings case 2006

a)     Arguing against the death sentence, the defence in the July 11 2006 Mumbai train bombings case said that the 12 convicted accused in the case committed offence under duress and the possibility of an iota of doubt about the evidence could act as mitigating circumstances.

b)     An advocate told a special MCOCA court that evidence in the case was based on confession statements, which indicated the emotional turmoil the accused were put through during their indoctrination.

c)     He said all confessions mention that the accused were brainwashed and indoctrinated by LeT operative Azam Cheema. They were shown films on atrocities against minority community, the Babri Masjid demolition. One mitigating circumstance is that the offence was committed under extreme mental and emotional disturbance.

12.

Growth to top last years, China hit minimal: FM (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)     Indias economic growth

b)     GDP

c)     Chinas economic growth

a)    Finance Minister Jaitley said he hopes the economy will grow faster this year than last, and expects that Asias third-largest economy will not see a big hit from Chinas slowdown. He also said his govts ambitious privatisation programme had been slowed by global market volatility.

b)     While fears of a China-led global slowdown have roiled financial markets in recent weeks, he said India stood to benefit from cooling growth in China because it led to weaker oil and commodity prices, and put India on the map as a potential alternative investment destination.

13.

Bhavani Island waits for Singapore touch (Page 7)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     Bhavani Island

b)     Krishna river

c)     Sentosa Island

a)    The picturesque Bhavani Island in river Krishna is considered a prized possession of the Tourism Department in Andhra Pradesh but the scenic spot has never got the recognition it deserves.

b)     Sources said development of the island resort on the lines of world famous Sentosa Island of Singapore, which is equipped with world-class attractions.

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