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Daily News Analysis 23-09-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

Ahead of Modis US visit, $3 bn defence deals cleared (Pgs 1,12)

a)     I.R

a)     A few hours before PM Modi left for the US, the Union govt approved two major defence deals between the two countries. The move is expected to give a boost to bilateral defence ties.

2.

Modis unrealistic American dreams (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     As the PM makes another US trip, with hopes of attracting greater foreign investment, there are pressing domestic issues back home seeking his attention, issues like poverty, hunger and misgovernance. A digital India backed by greater FDI flows can only play a limited role in tackling there.

3.

India, US look at expanding horizons (Page13)

a)     I.R

a)     The first India-US Strategic and Commercial Dialogue kicked off in Washington with a high-profile event.

4.

Modi leaves for Ireland, US (Page 12)

a)     I.R

a)     PM Modi left on Sept 22 for Ireland, expected to be the first stop in a trip, which will end with his visit to the Silicon Valley in the West Coast of the United States.

5.

UAVs help pinpoint Chinese transgression (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     High-resolution images from UAVs showing Chinese transgression into Indian territory played an important role in forcing them to withdraw in the stand-off at Burtse in northern Ladakh recently.

6.

Rajapaksa asks Sri Lankan govt to reject UN report (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Former President Rajapaksa called upon the Sri Lankan govt to reject the UN report on war crimes in Sri Lanka which concluded that horrific rights abuses were committed in the country in closing phase of civil war.

7.

Unaccompanied minor refugees on the rise in Europe: OECD (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     According to a new report on migration trends in 2015 by the OECD, the increasing number of unaccompanied minors seeking asylum in Europe is a particularly striking and worrying characteristic of the current refugee crisis.

8.

Syria gets Russian warplanes (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     In a sign that Moscows growing support for its ally is having an effect, Russia has delivered new arms (including warplanes) to Syria as the regime increases attacks on jihadists.

9.

Chidambaram rejected demand to ban Sanathan Sanstha in 2011 (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Former Home Minister P. Chidambaram had in 2011 rejected the demand of Maharashtra, Goa and Karnataka to declare Sanathan Sanstha a terrorist organisation.

10.

National Health Profile highlights poor dector-patient ratio (P12)

a)     National

b)     Health

a)     New official data shows that every govt hospital serves an estimated 61,000 people in India, with one bed for every 1833 people.

11.

Understanding the monsoon (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     A deeper understanding of monsoon air-sea interaction (the key objective of our joint endeavour) is a prerequisite for improved forecasts.

12.

West Bengal seeks GI tag for rasagolla (Page 9)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     Amid controversy over the origins of the iconic sweet, rasagolla, the West Bengal govt has set off the official process of staking its claim, by filing application for the Geographical Indication for the syrupy sweet.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

Ahead of Modis US visit, $3 bn defence deals cleared (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     India – US relations

b)     Defence ties

 

a)     A few hours before PM Modi left for the US, the Union govt approved two major defence deals between the two countries. The move is expected to give a boost to bilateral defence ties.

b)     According to sources, the Cabinet Committee on Security cleared the purchase of 22 Apache attack helicopters and 15 Chinook heavy-lift choppers from Boeing. The deals have direct commercial contracts with Boeing as well as a direct govt-to-govt component between the two govts.

c)     The deals will ensure that the US remains among the top military suppliers for the Indian armed forces for some years to come. It will also help in further advancing the nascent efforts by the Indian private sector to create an aerospace industrial base in India.

2.

Modis unrealistic American dreams (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     India – US relations

b)     Make in India initiative

c)     Digital India programme

d)     FDI

e)     UNGA

 

a)     According to the author, there is at least one dimension in which the distance between Modi and Jawaharlal Nehru is not so great after all. Modi will start with the annual meeting of the UNGA and from there proceed to the west coast.

b)     Nehru had undertaken this journey too, in 1949. However, we were a different country then, having inherited a bloodily-partitioned nation with a declining per capita income. On the other hand, India is today one of the worlds fastest-growing economies, hoarding a young labour stock and a substantial talent pool, making the task of its leadership a little easier by comparison.

c)   While India must constantly engage with rest of the world at all levels, the rest of the world does not hold the key to either the pace or inclusiveness of its economic growth. Therefore, it is altogether surprising that the leader of India should travel westward urging Come make in India.

d)     One should not expect Modi to travel to the US with an anachronistic agenda. Yet, one may expect him to be clear of what it will yield in relation to Indias current priorities. An argument is usually made out in terms of attracting FDI and, possibly, technology to drive the Digital India programme.

e)     It is incontestable that both foreign investment and the spread of Information and Communications Technology are very important for India. In fact, every effort must be made to accelerate their adoption. However, on FDI, much of what can be achieved via enabling legislation has been achieved. Further, the tariff barrier to trade has been rescinded along with quantitative controls.

f)     Foreign trade accounts for more than 50 percent of the Indian economy by now. However, the promised gains in manufacturing are disappointing, suggesting that domestic supply and demand conditions may be at least as important for Indian manufacturing as is an open trade regime. It is indeed correct that FDI has increased exponentially over the past one year, suggesting to some that this reflects a new international confidence in Indias economy.

g)     The hardship of everyday life faced by Indians has a history far older than that of Modis prime ministership. It is the result of decades of misgovernance. Resolving the citizens problems also involves a role for the States, where his writ hardly runs. But, as PM he is expected to show leadership in providing solutions to these.

h)     The technical element in the solutions is fully understood and entirely within our capability to handle. Even the financial constraints can be overcome through political will.

3.

India, US look at expanding horizons (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     India – US relations

b)     Economic ties

c)     Ease of doing business

d)     Terrorism

e)     Al-Quaeda

f)     Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT)

g)     Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM)

h)     D-Company

i)     Haqqani Network

j)     Islamic State (IS)

 

a)    The first India-US Strategic and Commercial Dialogue kicked off in Washington with a high-profile event.

b)     Indian sought to reassure US investors that the Modi govt was taking measures to ease doing business in India. The US corporate sector continued to flag weak contract enforcement, unpredictable policy and tax regimes, opaque regulatory mechanisms and rigid labour laws.

c)     The dialogue (established by US President Obama and PM Modi during their meeting last year) is taking place even as policy-makers on both sides admit that the bilateral synergy in strategic aspects is not matched in business and commerce.

d)     A strong counterterrorism statement that mentioned Pakistan, terrorist outfit LeT, and a condemnation of the recent attacks in Gurdaspur and Udhampur were the hallmarks of the ever-converging strategic interests that were flagged in joint statement by India and US after their first ever Strategic and Commercial Dialogue.

e)     External Affairs Minister Sushma said we reiterate the threat posed by al-Quaeda, LeT, JeM, D-Company, the Haqqani Network and other regional groups that seek to undermine stability in South Asia, adding that India and the US called for Pakistan to bring to justice the perpetrators of the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

f)     US Secretary of State John Kerry reiterated USs hope that India would also join the fight against the IS (the jihadist outfit that controls parts of Syria and Iraq) and he said India has pledged to be a key partner in the conversations surrounding the global fight against IS.

4.

Modi leaves for Ireland, US (Page 12)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Ireland relations

b)     Economic ties

c)     India – US relations

d)     Silicon Valley

e)     Skill India programme

f)     Digital India programme

a)     PM Modi left on Sept 22 for Ireland, expected to be the first stop in a trip, which will end with his visit to the Silicon Valley in the West Coast of US.

b)     However, the Dublin halt is special as Modi will be the first Indian PM since 1956 to have visited Ireland. In 1956, Jawaharlal Nehru paid his second visit (first was in 1949) to Ireland in the backdrop of the war that broke out in the West Asian region over monopoly of Suez canal. The dispute drew the UK, France and Israel into a war with Egypts Anwar Sadat.

c)     Modis visit to Ireland is an acknowledgement of recovery of the Irish economy from the devastating economic crisis that it survived just three years ago. Ireland has a significant number of Indian health professionals many of whom represent pharma majors like Reliance GeneMedix and Ranbaxy Ltd.

d)     External Affairs Ministry said in a statement that the present visit would provide an excellent opportunity to bolster economic relations between the two countries as there are clear complementarities between our flagship programmes, in particular Skill India and Digital India programmes and Irelands proven educational institutions.

e)     IT, smart agriculture and food processing industry provide other areas for closer cooperation for mutual advantage.

5.

UAVs help pinpoint Chinese transgression (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     India – China relations

b)     Border disputes

c)     Line of Actual Control (LAC)

d)     Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

e)     Heron

a)     High-resolution images from UAVs showing Chinese transgression into Indian territory played an important role in forcing them to withdraw in stand-off at Burtse in northern Ladakh recently.

b)     Officials said that images from Heron UAVs of a watchtower constructed inside Indian territory by the Chinese played a crucial role in border meetings with the Chinese side and forcing them to pull back from Indian territory.

c)     India operates a large number of Israeli-made Heron and Searcher UAVs. Heron is a medium-altitude, long-endurance UAV with endurance of over 24 hours and capable of flying at 35,000 feet. India deployed Herons on the 4000-km LAC in 2013 to monitor frequent Chinese transgressions. The UAVs are operated by the Air Force.

d)     A stand-off ensued after Indian troops demolished the watchtower erected by the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army soldiers 1.5 km inside the Indian side of LAC at Burtse.

6.

Rajapaksa asks Sri Lankan govt to reject UN report (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Sri Lankas human rights issue

b)     UNHRC

c)     Office of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

d)     UNSC

e)     LTTE

f)     Eelam war

a)   Former President Rajapaksa called upon Sri Lankan govt to reject UN report on war crimes in Sri Lanka which concluded that horrific rights abuses were committed in the country in the closing phase of the civil war.

b)     As for the report not mentioning any names in relation to alleged incidents, the former president said that it is obviously due to the fact that the OHCHR has no way of justifying such a linkage.

c)     Referring to another criticism that the report may have recommended imposing economic sanctions on Sri Lanka if his govt was still in power, he said neither UNHRC nor OHCHR could impose sanctions on a country. Only UNSC has that authority and they will not impose economic sanctions except in the most serious situations related to a threat to global security.

7.

Unaccompanied minor refugees on the rise in Europe: OECD (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Refugee crisis

b)     Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

c)     Immigration

 

a)     According to a new report on migration trends in 2015 by the OECD, the increasing number of unaccompanied minors seeking asylum in Europe is a particularly striking and worrying characteristic of the current refugee crisis. The responsibility for children falls on the state where they first arrive and are identified.

b)     The report concludes that the diversity of origin nations of asylum-seekers is challenging. The situation is unlikely to change in the future. 

c)     One in 10 new immigrants to developed countries in 2013 was from China.

d)     It says that flow of people from India was comparatively low, despite being the next largest country after China, India contributed only 4.4 percent of the new migrants and was in the fourth position after Poland and Romania.

e)     Immigration flows are on the rise to most OECD countries, and preliminary data for 2014 suggest that permanent migration flows increased sharply for the first time since 2007 and are back to their pre-financial crisis level, with 4.3 million permanent entries to the OECD.

8.

Syria gets Russian warplanes (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Islamic State (IS)

b)     Syria crisis

a)     In a sign that Moscows growing support for its ally is having an effect, Russia has delivered new arms (including warplanes) to Syria as regime increases attacks on jihadists.

b)     Syrias devastating four-year conflict has taken on a new dimension in recent days as Russia has moved to boost its military presence in the country, raising deep concerns in US.

c)   Official said the new fighter planes had arrived along with reconnaissance aircraft at a military base in Latakia province, the traditional heartland of President Bashar al-Assads regime. The regime had also received sophisticated military equipment to fight IS including targeting equipment and precision-guided missiles.

9.

Chidambaram rejected demand to ban Sanathan Sanstha in 2011 (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Sanathan Sanstha

b)     Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Amendment Act (UAPA)

c)     Section 153 (b) IPC

a)     Former Home Minister P. Chidambaram had in 2011 rejected the demand of Maharashtra, Goa and Karnataka to declare Sanathan Sanstha a terrorist organisation.

b)     Sources has accessed documents that show that Chidambaram opposed the demand to ban the organisation under section 35 (3) (c) of the UAPA, citing lack of specific incidents, activities to justify it.

c)     He wrote that none of the 3 State govts have addressed the real issue and they may be asked to indicate whether the organisation be banned or members of the organisation be prohibited from undertaking any activity under section 153 (b) IPC (imputations, assertions prejudicial to national integration).

10.

National Health Profile highlights poor dector-patient ratio (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Health

a)     National Health Profile 2015

b)     Public expenditure on Health

c)     Central Bureau for Health Intelligence (CBHI)

a)     Union Minister for Health released the National Health Profile 2015 prepared by CBHI.

b)    Data shows that every govt hospital serves an estimated 61,000 people in India, with one bed for every 1833 people. In undivided Andhra Pradesh, every govt hospital serves over 3 lakh patients while in Bihar, there is only one bed for every 8800 people.

c)     Every govt allopathic doctor serves a population of over 11,000 people, with Bihar and Maharashtra having the worst ratios.

d)     The Centres share of total public expenditure on health has fallen over last 2 years, and India spends less of its GDP on health than some of the worlds poorest countries. Among all States, undivided A.P had the highest public expenditure on health in 2012-13. Goa and the north-eastern States spent most on health per capita while Bihar and Jharkhand spent the least.

11.

Understanding the monsoon (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     Monsoons

b)     Bay of Bengal

c)     Sagar Nidhi

d)     Roger Revelle

e)     Ocean currents

a)     According to the author, the two ships (ocean research vessels Sagar Nidhi and Roger Revelle) were on a joint India-US field campaign (the second since 2013) to understand influence of the ocean on wet and dry phases of the summer monsoon.

b)    The monsoon is vital to the social and economic well-being of populations across the south Asian region. From farmers to national economic planning agencies, all would benefit from improved monsoon forecasts.

c)     The surface waters of the north Bay of Bengal are among the freshest (i.e. least saline) anywhere in the world, due to monsoon rains and discharge of fresh water from several mighty rivers. The warm, fresh upper layer of the Bay supplies prodigious amounts of moisture and heat to the atmosphere, forming masses of tall, dark clouds that bring monsoon rain deep inland.

d)     During recent campaign, scientists, engineers and students on two ships mapped the uppermost layer of Bay of Bengal in unprecedented detail. The data from the two ships, as well as moored and drifting instruments, are beginning to reveal how the upper ocean interacts with the atmosphere.

e)     Monsoon winds and ocean currents stir the fresh water over large distances, and 200km wide ocean eddies draw it into thin filaments. Yet the mixing between river water and sea water is very slow. The thin, fresh layer responds quickly to changes on the surface caused by winds and sunlight. At the same time, it helps to trap some of the suns heat at subsurface depths, to be released into the atmosphere days and weeks later.

f)     Realistic model simulation of monsoon clouds is a hard problem in atmospheric science. Errors in monsoon simulation can spread rapidly, potentially degrading global weather and climate forecasts. Therefore, a deeper understanding of monsoon air-sea interaction (the key objective of our joint endeavour) is a prerequisite for improved forecasts.

12.

West Bengal seeks GI tag for rasagolla (Page 9)

a)     National

b)     Geography

a)     Geographical Indication (GI)

b)     Rasagolla

a)     Amid controversy over the origins of iconic sweet rasagolla, the West Bengal govt has set off the official process of staking its claim, by filing application for the Geographical Indication for the syrupy sweet.

b)     A bitter-war has broken out over the origins of this white dripping-with-sweetness-ball of cottage-cheese. The fight is between Odisha and West Bengal, with each one claiming ownership of rasagolla.

c)     Odisha has staked claim to have invented years ago, the sweet associating it with a centuries old ritual of Lord Jagannath. West Bengal always thought of rasagolla as its own.

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