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Daily News Analysis 05-11-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

Shared heritage promotes links: Ansari (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     Vice-President Hamid Ansari addressed students of Udayana University in Bali, seeking to give them a comprehensive sense of why India and Indonesia are natural partners in education, culture, politics, economy, and spirit.

2.

Khurshid Kasuris flight of fancy (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     Pakistans ex-Foreign Minister Kasuri presents an overly optimistic picture in his book, not only of the state of India-Pakistan relations during his tenure in office, but also of his role. Though back channel talks did make progress, official talks hardly impacted the bilateral ties.

3.

India must ensure cheap drugs for Africa (Page 11)

a)     I.R

a)     Speaking on the sidelines of the India Africa Forum Summit, Michel Sidibe (Executive Director of UNAIDS) admitted to being scared as pressure mounts on India to relax norms, allowing patent protection.

4.

All countries must abide by 2002 declaration on conduct (Page 13)

a)     International

a)     Expressing interest and concern at the recent developments in the South China Sea, India called for an early conclusion of the Code of Conduct in the region for resolving disputes.

5.

Democracy suspended in the Maldives (Pages 1 and 14)

a)     International

a)     Citing danger to the lives of the citizens and threat to national security, President Abdulla Yameen Abdul Gayoom declared a state of emergency in the Maldives.

6.

Historic China-Taiwan meet prompts hope and suspicion (Pg 14)

a)     International

a)     Presidents of China and Taiwan will dine together in Singapore in what will be the first meeting of its kind since Chairman Maos Communist troops forced out their nationalist enemies from the Chinese mainland in 1949.

7.

Amendments to charter will resolve Nepal crisis (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Speaking at the UNHRC in Geneva, Nepals Deputy PM and Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa expressed hope that the differences in his country which arose following the promulgation of the new Constitution could be dealt by timely amendments in the future.

8.

S. China Sea row cancels ASEAN joint statement (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Differences over the South China Sea forced countries from Southeast Asia (along with China and the United States) to cancel a joint statement at a meeting of defence ministers in Malaysia.

9.

Collegium back, Dattu suggests Thakurs name (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)  Signalling that seniority reigns supreme in the highest judiciary following the revival of the collegium system, Chief Justice of India H.L. Dattu has recommended Justice Tirath Singh Thakur as his successor.

10.

IB flayed for stating faith of minders of Nirbhaya convict (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)    The Aam Aadmi Party government in Delhi has hit out at the Intelligence Bureau for giving a religious colour to the case involving the juvenile involved in the 2012 Nirbhaya gang rape.

11.

GST only a matter of time: FM (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)     Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley said that the passage of the GST Bill is only a matter of time and that he expects to table the Bankruptcy law in the winter session of Parliament.

12.

GSAT-15 set to replace INSAT-3A, 4B (Page 9)

a)     National

b)     S&T

a)     GSAT-15 (the mainly communications satellite being put in space next week) will replace two older spacecraft that will likely expire in the coming months.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

Shared heritage promotes links: Ansari (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Indonesia relations

b)     Strategic Partnership Agreement

a)     Vice-President Hamid Ansari addressed students of Udayana University in Bali, seeking to give them a comprehensive sense of why India and Indonesia are natural partners in education, culture, politics, economy, and spirit.

b)     He exchanged a MoU with Rector Kekut Suastika for collaboration in Ayurveda research with Indias AYUSH Ministry.

c)     Ansari underscored the importance of people-to-people contacts, pointing out that the Strategic Partnership Agreement signed in 2005 provides us with a strong base upon which a towering edifice of friendship can be built.

2.

Khurshid Kasuris flight of fancy (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Pakistan relations

b)     Kashmir dispute

c)     Kargil conflict 1999

d)     All Parties Hurriyat Conference (APHC)

e)     ISI

f)     Indian Mujahideen

g)     United Nations General Assembly (UNGA)

 

a)     Khurshid Mahmud Kasuri (the Foreign Minister of Pakistan from 2002 till 2007) was recently in the news (while in India) for the launch of his book Neither a Hawk nor a Dove: An Insiders Account of Pakistans Foreign Policy. This had less to do with the contents of the publication, and more with extraneous circumstances.

b)     Kashmir takes up a preponderantly large amount of space in this dissertation on Pakistans foreign policy. The narrative confirms the centrality of Kashmir in its relations with India, though Kasuri avoids referring to Kashmir as the unfinished business of Partition.

c)     He makes clear that he disagrees with Indias stand that there are only two parties to the Kashmir dispute (India and Pakistan) and reiterates Pakistans demand to include the third stakeholder (the Kashmiris) in negotiations.

d)     Kasuri presents an overly optimistic picture not only of the state of India-Pak relations during his tenure in office, but also of his role. By 2001, some of the hostility generated by the Kargil conflict (1999) had begun to dissipate. PM Atal Bihari Vajpayees invitation to President Pervez Musharraf to visit Agra for talks (2001) seemed to augur well for an improvement in relations.

e)     The failure of the talks was a setback. Worse was to follow, with Pakistan-based terrorists carrying out an attack on the Indian Parliament in Dec that year, and India mobilising its troops on the border in 2002. It was not till PM Vajpayee took initiative in 2004 to visit Islamabad that some measure of cordiality was restored.

f)     The 2004 Joint Statement between the Indian PM and the Pakistani President was significant in that Pakistan agreed that it would not allow its territory to be used to support terrorism against India. The Joint Statement also called for a revival of the Composite Dialogue (first mooted by PM I.K. Gujral in 1997). Proposals for confidence-building measures in Kashmir were also mooted.

g)     Despite the fact that the pendulum often swung between the extremes of comprehensive engagement and almost-complete disengagement, bilateral talks were never off the table. Part of the reason for this was that PMs Vajpayee and Manmohan Singh maintained cordial relations with their Pakistani counterparts, viz. Presidents Musharraf and Asif Ali Zardari, and Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani.

h)   However, this hardly meant that the atmosphere was warm. In his book, Kasuri accuses India of wanting to calibrate the dialogue process in accordance with its own priorities, and mistaking Pakistans flexibility for weakness.

i)     He also highlights the irreconcilable differences between the two countries over Kashmir, with India preferring the status quo as the basis for a solution to the Kashmir dispute, while Pakistan believing that a solution was possible only by revising the status quo.

j)     Propping up the separatist APHC in J&K was a deliberate and highly-provocative move on Pakistans part to queer the pitch regarding a negotiated settlement. Inviting them to Pak, and holding discussions on the possible contours of a resolution to the Kashmir dispute (together with wooing hard-line Hurriyat leaders like Syed Ali Shah Geelani) could have only one end result.

k)     A great deal separates India and Pakistan, and this goes well beyond dispute over Kashmir. During recent decades, terrorism has been the main weapon wielded by Pakistan to try to bleed India through a thousand cuts, and reflects Pakistans penchant for perilous risk-taking.

l)     Kasuris narrative glosses over the impact that such attacks (including the 2006 Mumbai suburban train attacks and the Nov 26 2008 attack on multiple targets in Mumbai) had on India-Pakistan relations. Instead, he delivers a homily on how statements by Indian officials critical of Pakistani role in these attacks adversely affect India-Pakistan relations.

m)     The period of improved India-Pakistan relations that Kasuri waxes eloquent about also coincided with the period when Pakistan was engaged in creating the Indian Mujahideen which was to be Pakistans proxy to wage war against India. The Karachi Project (conceived by the ISI during this period) involved training disaffected Muslim youth from India to be sent back to India to carry out terror attacks.

n)     At times, Kasuri seems to confuse between official-level talks and back channel negotiations when he talks of the forward movement taking place. The official-level Composite Dialogue or Comprehensive Dialogue Process after their revival in 2004 witnessed little forward movement during this period.

o)     Even summit-level talks hardly yielded results. In April 2005, during the meeting in Delhi between President Musharraf and PM Manmohan Singh, Pakistan tried to circumvent Indias insistence on ground-level authentication in the Siachen sector by proposing the use of sensors and aerial monitoring. India resisted this, being aware of Pakistans earlier perfidy on the Siachen Glacier.

p)   On another occasion in Sept 2005, even as India and Pak were talking peace on sidelines of UNGA, President Musharraf made a blistering attack on India on the Kashmir issue. In his book, Kasuri provides an ingenuous explanation for this speech, stating that the President had no idea of what was contained in his brief as it had been prepared by an official of Pakistans Permanent Mission in New York.

q)     Back channel negotiations were premised on replicating the European model (as adapted to Kashmir) of soft borders as against a redrawing of borders, and on making the boundary between two parts of Kashmir irrelevant.

r)     The idea was to pave way for better communication and contact between Kashmiri people on both sides of the LoC, and, at a later date, graduate to a coordinated consultative mechanism, progressive removal of tariff and non-tariff barriers and opening of more trade routes.

s)     To create the proper climate (on the Indian side), a series of Round Tables with stakeholders in J&K were organised. However, All this was contingent on an end to hostility, violence and terrorism.

3.

India must ensure cheap drugs for Africa (Page 11)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Africa relations

b)     Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

c)     Global HIV/AIDS movement

d)     UNAIDS

e)     TRIPS

a)     Speaking on the sidelines of India Africa Forum Summit, Michel Sidibe (Executive Director of UNAIDS) admitted to being scared as pressure mounts on India to relax norms, allowing patent protection.

b)     He also spoke about the weakening of global HIV/AIDS movement, the influence of the right-wing government in India on the national AIDS policy, and said that the HIV movement had become a victim of its own success.

c)     He said we are facing a global problem with HIV networks all over the world - from South Africa, where the activists took the government to court for access to treatment. All those movements against HIV are facing problems. If we are not careful, we will lose the social movement which could help us to work towards SDGs.

d)     He said we need to take AIDS out of isolation. AIDS needs to be looked at in a broader framework - with links to cervical cancer, maternal and child health and to broader social movements, non-communicable diseases, prices of Hepatitis-C drugs.

e)     He said that India has been able to use all the flexibilities under TRIPS to deliver affordable generic drugs. We need to ensure that whatever mechanism will be put in place, India will continue to protect TRIPS flexibilities by continuing to make sure access to affordable and quality medicines, which will not be compromised in the new regulatory framework.

f)     He also said the right to health needs to be protected. To protect the rights of the millions of people who are deprived, we should not accept any treaty or any new mechanism which will not help Africa in the transition period to continue to move towards universal health coverage. It means making everyone equal to protect right of the poor to access medicine.

4.

All countries must abide by 2002 declaration on conduct (Page 13)

a)     International

a)     Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN)  

b)     Declaration on the Conduct of Parties 2002  

c)     UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) 1982

d)     South China Sea

a)     Expressing interest and concern at recent developments in the South China Sea, India called for an early conclusion of the Code of Conduct in the region for resolving disputes.

b)     Defence Minister Parrikar made the comments while addressing the third edition of the ASEAN Defence Ministers Meeting-Plus in Malaysia. He hoped that the countries concerned would abide by 2002 Declaration on the Conduct of Parties.

c)     The agreement between ASEAN and China expresses desire to enhance favourable conditions for a peaceful and durable solution to differences and disputes among countries concerned.

d)     Parrikar said the situation in South China Sea and recent developments there have attracted interest and concern. This is natural since freedom of navigation in international waters, the right to passage and overflight, unimpeded commerce and access to resources in accordance with the recognised principles of international law (including the 1982 UNCLOS) are of concern to all of us.

e)     Five areas of cooperation had been identified in ADMM-Plus grouping (humanitarian assistance and disaster relief; maritime security; military medicine; counter terrorism and peace-keeping operations; and Expert Working Groups) to take the dialogue forward.

5.

Democracy suspended in the Maldives (Pages 1 and 14)

a)     International

a)     Maldives internal issues

b)     Maldives Constitution

c)     Maldivian Democratic Party (MDP)

d)     Maldives National Defence Force (MNDF)

 

a)     Citing danger to the lives of the citizens and threat to national security, President Abdulla Yameen Abdul Gayoom declared a state of emergency in the Maldives. The emergency measures effectively snatches away the freedoms that followed the August 2008 Constitution.

b)     The emergency has suspended the right to privacy (Article 24), freedom of assembly (Article 32), and several other rights guaranteed in the Constitution.

c)     Officials told that the Emergency was declared after the MNDF and the Maldives Police discovered a large cache of arms in different locations in the archipelago nation. But there were political reasons as well behind the move.

d)     The Emergency was imposed to pre-empt a mass rally by the main Opposition MDP, which could have negatively impacted the law and order situation.

6.

Historic China-Taiwan meet prompts hope and suspicion (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     China – Taiwan relations

a)     Presidents of China and Taiwan will dine together in Singapore in what will be the first meeting of its kind since Chairman Maos Communist troops forced out their nationalist enemies from the Chinese mainland in 1949.

b)     Officials said that Chinese President Xi Jinping and his Taiwanese counterpart Ma Ying-jeou will meet to exchange views on cross-Strait issues. Beijing still officially considers Taiwan a renegade province that should be reunified with the mainland.

7.

Amendments to charter will resolve Nepal crisis (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Nepal crisis

b)     Nepals new Constitution

c)     Madhesis concerns

d)     India-Nepal economic blockade

e)     UNHRC

 

a)     Speaking at the UNHRC in Geneva, Nepals Deputy PM and Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa expressed hope that the differences in his country which arose following promulgation of the new Constitution could be dealt by timely amendments in the future.

b)     The speech at the UNHRC came as an elaborate defence of the Nepali constitution which was promulgated on September 20 and was followed by the prolonged blockade on the economic gateways of Nepal located on India-Nepal border.

c)     China called on Nepal to resolve the differences over the new charter without outside interference, a veiled reference to India amid the agitation by Indian-origin Madhesis.

8.

S. China Sea row cancels ASEAN joint statement (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     ASEAN

b)     South China Sea

a)     Differences over the South China Sea forced countries from Southeast Asia (along with China and the United States) to cancel a joint statement at a meeting of defence ministers in Malaysia.

b)     The meeting was split between countries that agreed with China and those that strongly disagreed, including Australia, Japan and the US.

c)     China maintains that its territorial claims in South China Sea must be discussed with individual countries that also have claims. It has consistently opposed efforts to have conflicting claims discussed in a regional setting like ASEAN.

9.

Collegium back, Dattu suggests Thakurs name (Page 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Collegium system

b)     National Judicial Appointments Commission (NJAC) law

c)     Chief Justice of India

d)     Supreme Court

a)     Signalling that seniority reigns supreme in the highest judiciary following the revival of the collegium system, Chief Justice of India H.L. Dattu has recommended Justice Tirath Singh Thakur as his successor.

b)     It is a convention that the present Chief Justice recommend the name of his successor to the govt. After the Law Ministry clears his name, the file will go to the Prime Ministers Office and finally reaches the President, after whose approval the Warrant of Appointment will be issued.

c)     Though considered a formal routine and a courtesy from the incumbent to his successor, Chief Justice Dattus recommendation this time gains significance as it comes shortly after a five-judge Constitution Bench struck down the NJAC law and restored the collegium system of judicial appointments on October 16.

10.

IB flayed for stating faith of minders of Nirbhaya convict (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     National

b)     Polity

a)     Nirbhaya Act

b)     Juvenile Justice Act

c)     Intelligence Bureau (IB)

a)    The Aam Aadmi Party govt in Delhi has hit out at the Intelligence Bureau for giving a religious colour to the case involving the juvenile involved in the 2012 Nirbhaya gang rape.

b)     In its report, the IB said that three Muslim officers were supervising the welfare home when the juvenile and a Kashmiri juvenile accused in the Delhi High Court blast case were kept in the same cell, leading to alleged radicalisation of the former and fear that he might join the militant ranks.

c)     According to a senior Delhi govt official, the juvenile is now being subjected to counselling to reverse the damage, if any, caused by the alleged radicalization.

11.

GST only a matter of time: FM (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)     Goods and Services Tax (GST) Bill

b)     Bankruptcy law

c)     Corporate tax

a)     Union Finance Minister Jaitley said that the passage of the GST Bill is only a matter of time and that he expects to table the Bankruptcy law in the winter session of Parliament.

b)     Also regarding corporates, Jaitley said that he will soon be announcing the first tranche of exemptions from corporate tax that are to be done away with. The first round of corporate rate cuts (part of govts longer term agenda of cutting corporate tax rates from 30 to 25percent) will be announced in next Budget.

12.

GSAT-15 set to replace INSAT-3A, 4B (Page 9)

a)     National

b)     S&T

a)     GSAT-15

b)     GAGAN

c)     INSAT-3A

d)     INSAT-4B

e)     Ariane-5

f)     Arabsat-6B/Badr-7

a)     GSAT-15 (the mainly communications satellite being put in space next week) will replace two older spacecraft (INSAT-3A and INSAT-4B) that will likely expire in the coming months.

b)     Its 24 transponders are solely in the Ku band and will cater to DTH television first, besides supporting thousands of VSAT operators who provide broadband services; and DSNG (digital satellite news gathering) for TV news channels.

c)     ISRO Chairman said that GSAT-15 will not add new transponder capacity to the country; it will ensure sustainability of service for the capacity-hungry DTH sector. It will also carry the third GAGAN satellite navigation transponder as a back-up for airlines and other users of augmented GPS-based systems.

d)     It will be launched on Nov 11 from Kourou in French Guiana (in South America) on the European Arianespaces Ariane-5 launcher. It will be flown along with Saudi Arabias Arabsat-6B/Badr-7.

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