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Daily News Analysis 17-11-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

De-link terror and religion: Modi (Page 1)

a)     I.R

a)     India called for a comprehensive global strategy to delink terror and religion, and to promote cooperation among countries to counter radicalisation.

2.

G20 vows to step up anti-terror coordination (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     The G20 pledged stepped-up cooperation to combat terrorism (especially the threat from the Islamic State) on the final day of their two-day summit in the Turkish town on the Mediterranean coast.

3.

G20 nations narrow differences on climate change (Page 14)

a)     I.R

a)     The worlds largest economies narrowed their differences over the stand on climate change ahead of the COP 21 talks in Paris that start at the end of this month.

4.

Road from Paris for G-20 (Page 10)

a)     International

a)     The terrorist attacks in Paris have given the world the necessary urgency for a united fight against Islamic State. Given their scale and specifics, the global response was bound to be swift and collaborative.

5.

Mastermind of Paris attacks identified as Belgian national (Pages 1, 12, 14)

a)     International

a)     In an extraordinary address to both Houses of Parliament, President Francois Hollande pledged that France would step up strikes against Syria, the country where the headquarters of the Daesh (the Islamic State) is located and recent terror attacks in Paris were planned.

6.

Nepal PM Oli draws ire for anti-India speech (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Nepals Madhesi Opposition has slammed PM K. P. Sharma Oli for criticising India in the weekend speech that was his first televised address to the country since taking over as the Prime Minister on October 11.

7.

Suu Kyi will play a critical role in Myanmar (Pg 11)

a)     International

a)     Thant Myint-U says that its hard to imagine a Myanmar where Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is not head and shoulders above all other political figures.

8.

Lets be realistic on FDI (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Economy

a)     Without changing the overall policy landscape and attitude, India cannot expect to make a success of Make in India with the help of FDI alone.

9.

WPI inflation at -3.8 percent, 12th straight month in negative territory (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)     WPI inflation in October was -3.8 percent, compared with -4.5 percent in September, the 12th consecutive month in which WPI inflation was negative.

10.

Next generation missile to be test-fired (Page 13)

a)     National

b)     S&T

a)     The Long Range Surface-to-Air Missile (which can intercept incoming targets at a range of 80 km) is all set to be test-fired from a naval warship this month.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

De-link terror and religion: Modi (Page 1)

a)     I.R

a)     G-20 Summit

b)     Terrorism

c)     Paris terror attacks

d)     Islamic State (IS)

e)     West Asia crisis

 

a)     India called for a comprehensive global strategy to delink terror and religion, and to promote cooperation among countries to counter radicalisation.

b)    Addressing the G20 leaders at a session on terrorism, PM Modi said we need to involve religious leaders, thinkers and opinion-makers for a social movement against extremism. He said this was needed most in countries where extremism was most prevalent and highlighted the urgency for promoting broader peace and stability in West Asia and Africa.

c)     Hitting out at terrorism (especially that perpetrated by countries as an instrument of state policy), Modi said there was a new level of threat to pluralist and open societies. We must isolate those who support and sponsor terrorism and stand with those who share our values of humanism.

d)     He said the West Asian crisis focused global attention on an acute humanitarian challenge. He called for a long-term approach to, and a stronger role for the United Nations in, dealing with it.

2.

G20 vows to step up anti-terror coordination (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     G-20 summit

b)     Terrorism

c)     Islamic State (IS)

 

a)     The G20 pledged stepped-up cooperation to combat terrorism (especially the threat from the Islamic State) on the final day of their two-day summit in the Turkish town on the Mediterranean coast.

b)     It resolved to develop measures for better information-sharing, border management and to strengthen global aviation security.

c)     The G20 statement, a meeting between US President Obama and Russian President Putin on the sidelines of the summit, and resoluteness expressed by other leaders were all signs of a more cohesive global strategy against the IS menace.

d)     Obama said the agreement will allow US personnel to pass threat information including on IS to French partners even more quickly and more often, because we need to be doing everything we can to protect ourselves against more attacks.

e)     It also expressed concern over the acute and growing flow of foreign terrorist fighters and the threat it poses for all states, including countries of origin, transit and destination.

f)     To tackle the phenomenon, the G20 leaders resolved to develop measures for operational information-sharing and border management. They also pledged to cooperate on preventive measures and appropriate criminal justice response.

3.

G20 nations narrow differences on climate change (Page 14)

a)     I.R

a)     G-20 Summit

b)     Climate change

c)     Paris Climate Conference 2015

d)     Doha Round of WTO

e)     Bali declaration

f)     Trade facilitation agreement

a)     The worlds largest economies narrowed their differences over the stand on climate change ahead of the COP 21 talks in Paris that start at the end of this month.

b)     After intense negotiations on the key issue of whether to mention the aim to limit the rise in global warming to 2 degrees, they included the two-degree-goal in the G20 communique.

c)     The final text did not specify the target deadline for the phasing out of fossil fuel subsidies, taking care of a major concern for Indian negotiators.

d)     The communique also reflected Indias concerns on the Doha Round of WTO. It said we are committed to working together for a successful Nairobi Ministerial Meeting that has a balanced set of outcomes, including on the Doha Development Agenda and provides clear guidance to post-Nairobi work.

e)     As sought by India, the G20 agreed to increase efforts to implement all elements of the Bali Package, including those on agriculture, development, public stockholding as well as the prompt ratification and implementation of the Trade Facilitation agreements.

f)    On regional and plurilateral trade agreements (on which India in its intervention had raised concerns) the communique said the G20s efforts will be ensure these agreements are transparent and inclusive.

g)     The G20 expressed deep disappointment with continued delay in implementing the IMF quota and governance reforms agreed in 2010 and urged the US to ratify the reforms as soon as possible.

h)     PM Modi sought greater international cooperation for the return of illicit money to the country of origin. Addressing G20 leaders, he wanted them to address the issues of excessive banking secrecy and complex legal and regulatory frameworks.

i)     Modi said the G20 must continue according priority to combating corruption and sought the implementation of the Common Reporting Standard based on Automatic Exchange of Tax Information by all countries.

j)     On the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Antalya, PM Modi held bilateral meetings with Spain, South Korea and Turkey, and also met with the King of Saudi Arabia Salman Al Saud.

k)   In the meeting with Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan, he sought support of the country for Indias membership in the four export control regimes. UN reform, civil nuclear cooperation, and cooperation in space and agricultural research also came up for discussion.

4.

Road from Paris for G-20 (Page 10)

a)     International

a)     G-20 Summit

b)     Terrorism

c)     Paris terror attacks

d)     Islamic State in Syria (ISIS)

e)     Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism (CCIT)

a)     The terrorist attacks in Paris have given the world the necessary urgency for a united fight against IS. Given their scale and specifics, the global response was bound to be swift and collaborative. In the event (the G-20 summit in Antalya), Turkey became a timely platform to launch this fight.

b)     As leaders of the worlds biggest economies gathered, it was heartening to see pull-aside meeting between US President Obama and Russian President Putin, who set aside their differences to speak about a common strategy to target ISIS.

c)     Besides getting the US and Russia on the same page, it will be equally important that G-20 leaders take away from the summit a commitment on stopping all the routes of finance and arms to ISIS.

d)     This is important because in the past, ISIS (or Daesh) has benefited from worlds disunity over policies on Syria, which meant that countries such as Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey were able to arm, support and supply fighters for anti-Assad rebel groups in Syria, support that eventually found its way to ISIS that has become a dominant force in the area.

e)     Europe, especially France and the UK, as well as the US have been guilty of turning a blind eye to this support for several years, in the hope that they would see Syrian President Bashar al-Assad toppled. Unless the G-20 agrees to stop all such support, put aside its concerns over Assads regime and target ISIS in a concerted manner, all the outrage over the attacks will not produce results.

f)     It is here that India is now trying to have its voice heard with PM Modis intervention at the G-20, where he proposed a 10-point strategy to tackle terrorism together. These include obvious actions on isolating sponsors of terrorism, monitoring cyberspace and financial activities, and cooperation and intelligence-sharing across the world.

g)    It also includes the demand for UN to finally push through the CCIT that India proposed in 1996 and has since demanded consistently, especially in wake of 26/11. Movement on this convention has only been held up because countries remain disunited on their definitions of terrorism. ISISs actions should clarify that definition.

h)     The road to G-20 summits most pressing obligation has come from Paris. It is important that they set the course for action against ISIS in the next few weeks at COP21 summit in Paris, and complete the circle.

5.

Mastermind of Paris attacks identified as Belgian national (Pages 1, 12, 14)

a)     International

a)     Paris terror attacks

b)     Islamic State (IS)

a)    In an extraordinary address to both Houses of Parliament, President Francois Hollande pledged that France would step up strikes against Syria, the country where the headquarters of the Daesh (the Islamic State) is located and recent terror attacks in Paris were planned.

b)     Hollande said Parliament would consider extending the state of emergency for another three months, and made a strong case for amending the Constitution to give more powers to the govt for tackling terrorism. He said this would include the powers to expel foreigners posing a serious risk to public order.

c)     Meanwhile, there has been a major breakthrough in the investigations into terror strikes in Paris with the identification of the alleged mastermind of the attacks, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian national currently in Syria.

6.

Nepal PM Oli draws ire for anti-India speech (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Nepal crisis

b)     Nepals new Constitution

c)     Madhesis concerns

a)   Nepals Madhesi Opposition has slammed PM K. P. Sharma Oli for criticising India in the weekend speech that was his first televised address to the country since taking over as the Prime Minister on October 11.

b)     In his speech, PM Oli had accused the Indian Oil Corporation of not delivering fuel despite early and advance payment for fuel. He pointed out that the current blockade will leave a negative impact about India on the younger generation of the Nepali youth.

7.

Suu Kyi will play a critical role in Myanmar (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     Myanmar elections

b)     National League for Democracy (NLD)

c)     Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP)

 

a)     The historic election in Myanmar on Nov 8 is the first step to a peaceful transition of power after decades of military rule. The people of Myanmar have given an absolute majority to Aung San Suu Kyi-led NLD. In step, the military (which continues to exercise power over the defeated USDP) seems committed to play by the norms of electoral politics.

b)     In an interview, Thant Myint-U (author of Where China Meets India: Burma and the New Crossroads of Asia and chairman of Yangon Heritage Trust) says the election marks beginning of not just transition but also democratisation of Myanmars society where minorities are yet to find space.

c)   He said Myanmars elections are the first general elections since the beginning of political reforms in 2011. They are a test of the countrys democratic transition. Myanmars path to democracy has been a top-down process, begun by the military elite, that has so far kept on board all parts of the political spectrum.

d)     The Constitution is hybrid: it has democratic elements, but still protects core military interests. The first step was the 2010 election (which was boycotted by the NLD), which ushered in a far more open political environment and competitive politics. In this second step, the main opposition (the NLD) will take over the reins of govt, but within this hybrid constitutional framework.

e)     He said its hard to imagine a Myanmar where Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is not head and shoulders above all other political figures. She will play a critical role in Myanmar politics for many years to come.

f)     The relationship between the current USDP govt and the military has been a cooperative one. But the USDP is headed by recently retired generals. A govt led by former opposition leaders and civilians with no military background may have a far different relationship to the military, which will still control key offices.

8.

Lets be realistic on FDI (Page 11)

a)     National

b)     Economy

a)     Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) policy

b)     Make in India programme

c)     United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)

a)     In yet another significant move to attract FDI, the govt has opened the door wider in several major sectors of the Indian economy, through what it calls path-breaking amendments in the extant FDI policy.

b)     These amendments can be clubbed into three categories: a radical change in FDI regime in the construction sector; an increase in threshold of foreign participation in several key sectors, including defence, broadcasting, private sector banks, non-scheduled air transport service, ground-handling services, and credit information companies; and simplification of the procedures for foreign participation in a number of sectors.

c)    The scope for FDI has been widened over the years, a move that has been predicated on the understanding that India needs to attract a large amount of foreign investment and that FDI needs to be regulated only in areas which are of strategic importance, or which have implications for national sensitivities.

d) Therefore, the announcement made on Nov 10 should be seen as another attempt by the Indian govt to attract sizeable volumes of foreign capital by easing the procedures, which were limiting these inflows. But as it makes its best efforts to catch attention of foreign investors, govt may also like to consider the global realities and its own experience in this regard, since the country turned investor-friendly some 2 decades back.

e)     First, globally, FDI flows of all hues have not been growing, especially from the developed countries. The reality is that the developed countries are reaping the benefits of their past investments. Real outflows from them are far less than what the aggregates suggest. Reinvested earnings (profits generated and retained in host countries) are bolstering the reported FDI flows.

f)   According to the UNCTAD, the share of reinvested earnings is reported to have accounted for as much as four-fifths of total outflows in 2014 for select developed countries.

g)     Another important factor is the costs associated with FDI, especially the servicing burden and crowding out of domestic investment. Developing countries like India have reached out to FDI not only because of the capital they need, but more importantly, for the technologies to make their entities more competitive.

h)    One of the reasons the govt gives for enhancing sectoral caps is that of fragmented ownership issues. The reality is somewhat different. During the decade 2004-05 to 2013-14, foreign investors in the manufacturing sector have consolidated their position: a majority of the companies which received what may be termed as real FDI are either wholly foreign-owned or have sole control.

i)   There was a special mention in new policy announcement about the construction sector and the need to build 50 million houses for poor. This once again reveals that not much thought has been given to the nature of foreign investment that the sector has attracted so far. A vast majority of investment in this sector is by private equity investors and Indians bringing back (black) money in one form or the other.

j)     Without changing overall policy landscape and attitude, India cannot expect to make a success of Make in India with help of FDI alone. The new measures in no way address this vital issue. FDI cannot be a substitute for domestic resource mobilisation, and FDI policy cannot be a substitute for prudent domestic policies.

k)     Policymakers need to take cognisance of the fact that it is domestic investment which has provided an overwhelmingly large share of Indias capital formation and has, therefore, been instrumental in pushing up the countrys growth rates.

9.

WPI inflation at -3.8 percent, 12th straight month in negative territory (Page 15)

a)     Economy

a)     WPI inflation

b)     Base effect

a)     WPI inflation in October was -3.8 percent, compared with -4.5 percent in September, the 12th consecutive month in which WPI inflation was negative.

b)     This was mostly driven by a high-base effect, muted commodity prices in India and internationally, and poor demand in the economy.

c)     One of the statistical reasons for WPI inflation remaining negative for so long is the high-base effect. That is, the index numbers in the year-earlier period were higher.

10.

Next generation missile to be test-fired (Page 13)

a)     National

b)     S&T

a)     Long Range Surface-to-Air Missile (LR-SAM)

b)    Short Range Surface-to-Air Missile (SR-SAM)

c)     Maitri poject

d)     Akash project

e)     Barak-I missile

f)     INS Vikramaditya

g)     Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO)

a)     The Long Range Surface-to-Air Missile (which can intercept incoming targets at a range of 80 km) is all set to be test-fired from a naval warship this month.

b)     LR-SAM (also known as Barak NG (next generation)) is being co-developed by the DRDO from India and Israel Aerospace Industries of Israel. It has been successfully test-fired against a flying target in Israel in November 2014.

c)     While the LR-SAM will form the first tier of the multi-layered air defence at long ranges, the shorter ranges are handled by Barak-I missiles with range of around 10 km which are currently operational on all frontline warships including the aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya.

d)   The Navy intends to replace the Barak-Is and the Defence Ministry has in March given approval for co-development of a SR-SAM (Maitri) by the DRDO with MBDA of France.

e)     The project has been in the works since 2007, but did not make progress as it clashed with the indigenous Akash project.

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