Current Affairs > Daily Current affairs

Back
Daily News Analysis 24-11-2015

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

ESSENCE OF THE ARTICLE

1.         

 

Multi-pronged approach to countering IS threat (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     Against the growing tide of Islamic State violence and concerns about its possible domestic repercussions, India toughened its posture on terrorism with PM Modi asking that countries be held accountable for providing terror sanctuaries.

2.

India, Malaysia vow to strengthen defence ties (P13)

a)     I.R

a)     India and Malaysia have agreed to strengthen their defence cooperation, including improved maritime security and disaster response in the region.

3.

The India Story, in word & deed (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     On his visit to Kuala Lumpur to attend the ASEAN-India summit, PM Modi was in familiar form, pitching India as an investment destination to the East Asian countries.

4.

Indias carbon caution in Paris (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     India needs to stake a claim on a fair and reasonable share of the global carbon budget. It must also confront the perception that this is a demand for the unrestricted use of coal.

5.

Mistry, Mahindra back plea for climate deal (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     International

a)     Tata Group Chairman Cyrus Mistry and Anand Mahindra of the Mahindra Group joined their peers from Brazil, China, Europe, and US in urging world leaders to reach an ambitious climate deal in Paris next month.

6.

Hollande to meet Obama as US wavers on Russian role (Page 14)

a)     International

a)  French President Hollande will meet President Obama in Washington this week and then travel to Moscow to meet President Putin in an effort to draw Russia closer to the 65-nation coalition against the Islamic State, but the US continues to waver in its approach towards Russia.

7.

On first Tehran visit in years, Putin lifts ban on nuclear cooperation with Iran (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     President Vladimir Putin eased restrictions on Russian companies working on Iranian enrichment sites as he travelled to Tehran for his first visit since 2007.

8.

All States but TN to roll out Food Security Act by April (Page 13)

a)     National

a) Union Food Minister Ram Vilas Paswan said all States (barring Tamil Nadu) are on board for implementing the National Food Security Act by April next.

9.

Male child still preferred, show Census data (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     National

b)     Social issue

a)    New Census data indicate that two processes around the preference for a male child are going on simultaneously in India - prenatal sex determination and repeated pregnancies.

 

S.NO.

NEWS ITEM

SYLLUBUS

BACKGROUND

IMPORTANT POINTS

1.         

 

Multi-pronged approach to countering IS threat (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     I.R

a)     Terrorism

b)     Islamic State (IS)

c)     Paris terror attacks

a)     Against the growing tide of IS violence and concerns about its possible domestic repercussions, India toughened its posture on terrorism with PM Modi asking that countries be held accountable for providing terror sanctuaries.

b)     The contours of Indias multi-pronged response to the IS threat emerged even as the post-Paris global response was firming up despite fear writ across the world of fresh attacks.

c)     Indias multi-layered stand on terrorism comes against the backdrop of reports indicating that almost 150 Indian youths may have been enticed by the IS ideology, about two dozen Indians are in the Syrian battlefield, and many others have been intercepted while trying to reach the IS sanctuary.

d)     In India, officials said Modi would spend almost three days with top intelligence and police officers in December, discussing all security threats, especially those rising from the influence of the IS, the role of social media in violent crimes and left-wing extremism.

2.

India, Malaysia vow to strengthen defence ties (Page 13)

a)     I.R

a)     India – Malaysia relations

b)     Defence ties

c)     Maritime security cooperation

d)     Terrorism

e)     Islamic State

 

a)     India and Malaysia have agreed to strengthen their defence cooperation, including improved maritime security and disaster response in the region.

b)     Raising the issue of terrorism, PM Modi said that Malaysia had provided leadership in combating extremism and radicalisation, rejecting any link between terrorism and religion, and in highlighting the real values of Islam.

c)     India and Malaysia have signed three MoUs pertaining to cybersecurity, cooperation in management, delivery and monitoring of govt programmes and cultural exchanges.

3.

The India Story, in word & deed (Page 10)

a)     I.R

a)     ASEAN-India summit

b)     TRIPS agreement

c)     IPR issue

d)     Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

e)     OECD

a)     On his visit to Kuala Lumpur to attend the ASEAN-India summit, PM Modi was in familiar form, pitching India as an investment destination to the East Asian countries.

b)     Taking credit for turning the Indian economy around since his govt took office, Modi outlined his plans for economic reform to the transformation of India. He also offered specific opportunities to ASEAN countries on investing in infrastructure in India, particularly in Metro Rail systems, housing, road, rail and waterways.

c)     To begin with,  several of the promises Modi gave at the ASEAN-India summit are reiterations of promises he had made a year ago, and many are beginning to wonder if some of them (like the promise of the GST legislation) can be kept, given his relations with the Opposition in Parliament.

d)     Modi has been keen to emphasise that a liberalised IPR patents regime is just around the corner, more in line with what the US and EU countries have been demanding, but it is unclear if this would militate against Indias Patents Act that is in line with the TRIPS agreement.

e)     Finally, many of the commitments he has given (like plan for a mammoth increase in renewable energy to 175GW) will require at least $200-$300 billion in funds and debt payments, which are yet to be clearly sourced.

f)     Meanwhile, even as India acts East in order to sew up the India-ASEAN FTA on services and investments, ASEAN countries are themselves looking East much more, with the launch of the TPP with the US, that India is not a part of.

g)     It is also time to note that global narrative has changed as well, with OECD now revising its world GDP outlook on the back of what it calls a dramatic global trade slowdown, especially in emerging markets. At a time like this, it is important that India shifts its focus from marketing to delivery, and shores up its image as a credible market and investment destination.

4.

Indias carbon caution in Paris (Page 11)

a)     International

a)     Paris Climate Summit 2015

b)     Greenhouse gases (GHGs)

c)     Carbon budget

d)     Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs)

e)     United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

a)     As nations prepare to meet in Paris to strike a long-term climate deal, the gap between what the science demands that nations do and the actions that they are prepared to undertake has never been starker. The parties to the climate convention are still arguing about what they can afford to do, rather than doing what it takes to deal with the problem.

b)     The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) has pointed out clearly that there is only a specific cumulative amount of GHGs that humanity can emit into the atmosphere, to keep the rise in global average temperature below a specified level, for a given level of uncertainty. This cumulative amount includes what has been emitted in the past until today, as well as what can be emitted in the future.

c)     The Synthesis Report of the AR5 provides two values for different probabilities. For a less than 33 percent chance of a global temperature increase of 2 Degree Celsius, the cumulative emissions between 2011 and 2100 of CO2 specifically must stay below 1000 billion tonnes. For less than 50 percent chance of crossing 2 Degree C, the corresponding figure is 1300 billion tonnes. There may be a little more room for flexibility.

d)     However, the estimate based on AR5 is that between now and the end of the century, if we take account of non-carbon dioxide gases too, the total emissions lie within 1192 to 2000 billion tonnes for same range of probabilities, though the higher end is unlikely to find much favour among the most vulnerable countries.

e)     Faced with limits of this kind, one would have thought the appropriate response would be to find a fair and equitable distribution (on a per capita basis but with possibly other indicators included) of this global carbon budget among all nations. After all, the atmosphere is a global commons that should be shared equitably.

f)     Indeed, in grim counter-point, the secretariat of the UNFCCC has estimated that the total CO2 emissions expected after the reduction from these commitments (known as INDCs) amounts to 750 billion tonnes until 2030.

g)    In this situation, India (like a majority of the developing nations, with perhaps the exception of China and a few oil-producers) is in a double bind. On the one hand, an early agreement (based on a reasonably safe level of global carbon budget that would ensure that burden of adaptation does not become onerous for the bulk of Indian population, and indeed that of the world) is a necessity. Currently, the negotiations do not seem headed in this direction at all.

h)     On the other hand, without adequate access to an equitable share of global carbon budget, Indias developmental efforts would be faced with energy costs that would have no previous parallel in human history. Carbon space that is once used up cannot be recovered, since GHGs once emitted persist in atmosphere-land-surface ocean system for at least a millennium.

i)   The INDCs of the developed countries constitute a carbon grab on this scarce resource, and a weak climate deal would only sanctify this strategic loss to India and other developing nations.

j)     First, the so-called red line (of the UPA dispensation) that India would accept no limits whatsoever on its emissions, even in long-term, is outdated and must be discarded. India also needs to frontally confront the perception in the West, and among many environmentalists, that this is a demand for the unrestricted use of coal. Coal is indispensable as the last resort energy source in this pursuit.

k)     Second, India must step forward to operationalise the concept of equity in climate negotiations and not simply use it in defensive mode. It is possible that current operational definition of differentiation in the UNFCCC of the so-called Annex-I and non-Annex-I nations may have to be eventually given up. Chinas declared INDC has already opened door in this direction.

l)     But the concept of a fair share of the global carbon budget that ensures the principle of equity and common, but differentiated, responsibilities on a continuous scale of differentiation will provide a good benchmark for negotiations. Third, with an adequate benchmark for equity, India and developing countries can adequately engage with any process of the periodic review of commitments that would emerge from the negotiations.

m)     There is no reason India should not continue to insist on a balanced and comprehensive agreement that includes adequacy in technology transfer and finance. On technology, India could provide greater specificity, denoting broad technology areas where access must be guaranteed.

n)    India must firmly avoid the temptation in Paris to view negotiations solely through the lens of realpolitik. Securing a part of India and the developing countries developmental future within the framework of global environmental sustainability is the challenge, and India cannot afford to drop the ball at this juncture.

5.

Mistry, Mahindra back plea for climate deal (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     International

a)     Climate change

b)     Paris Climate summit 2015

c)     Carbon emissions

a)     Tata Group Chairman Cyrus Mistry and Anand Mahindra of the Mahindra Group joined their peers from Brazil, China, Europe, and US in urging world leaders to reach an ambitious climate deal in Paris next month.

b)     The heads of these global firms believe an economically sustainable shift to a low-carbon future will create jobs and growth across the world.

c)     A key challenge in climate negotiations is how emerging economies will find investment to shift to greener energy systems and build infrastructure to withstand the floods and heat waves that scientists say are likely to increase as the climate changes.

d)  The CEOs hope to capitalise on the momentum created by pledges from more than 160 countries (notably from the US and China) bolster the case that governments have industry support to take decisive action to combat climate change.

6.

Hollande to meet Obama as US wavers on Russian role (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Islamic State (IS)

b)     Paris terror attacks

 

a)  French President Hollande will meet President Obama in Washington this week and then travel to Moscow to meet President Putin in an effort to draw Russia closer to the 65-nation coalition against the IS, but the US continues to waver in its approach towards Russia.

b)     In the aftermath of Paris terror attacks, Russian and US foreign ministers had stated that they would explore closer counterterrorism cooperation, but on ground only incremental progress has been made.

c)     The Russians and the coalition had established a communication channel days before Paris but the first consequential exchange happened after the terror strike, when the Russians informed the coalition of its plans to bomb Raqqa, the IS headquarters.

d)     Meanwhile, France launched air strikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq on Nov 23 in the first sorties from the Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier, newly deployed in the eastern Mediterranean.

7.

On first Tehran visit in years, Putin lifts ban on nuclear cooperation with Iran (Page 14)

a)     International

a)     Russia – Iran relations

b)     Iran – P5+1 nuclear deal

c)     Irans nuclear programme

 

a)     President Vladimir Putin eased restrictions on Russian companies working on Iranian enrichment sites as he travelled to Tehran for his first visit since 2007.

b)     Under a historic July deal with world powers, Iran agreed to dramatically scale back its nuclear programme, making it much more difficult for it to develop nuclear weapons.

c)     Tehran agreed to slash by two-thirds the number of centrifuges, machines that can enrich or purify uranium to make it suitable for peaceful uses but also for a nuclear weapon.

8.

All States but TN to roll out Food Security Act by April (Page 13)

a)     National

a)     National Food Security Act 

b)     Public Distribution System (PDS)

a)     Union Food Minister Ram Vilas Paswan said all States (barring Tamil Nadu) are on board for implementing the National Food Security Act by April next.

b)    So far, 22 States and UTs have rolled out the Act which covers up to 67 percent of the population (75 percent rural and 50 percent urban) and gives with 5 kilogram of subsidised rice or wheat or coarse cereals per identified beneficiary. It is mandatory for States and UTs to adopt digital identification of the beneficiaries, arrange for doorstep delivery of foodgrains and constitute grievance redressal cells before they roll out the scheme.

c)   Representatives of 11 States said they would be ready with digitisation and identification of beneficiaries by March next year. However, the Tamil Nadu representative said the PDS was universal in the State and as such it was difficult to identify beneficiaries. To switch to a targeted system would involve a policy decision.

9.

Male child still preferred, show Census data (Pages 1 and 12)

a)     National

b)     Social issue

a)     Sex Ratio

b)     Census 2011

a)    New Census data indicate that two processes around the preference for a male child are going on simultaneously in India - prenatal sex determination and repeated pregnancies. Data on family sizes and sex ratios released on Nov 23 showed that at every family size, there were more boys born than girls.

b)     However as family sizes got bigger, the sex ratio within the family got much less skewed, indicating that families with fewer or no sons were the ones choosing to have repeated pregnancies. As families get larger, the survival odds of girl children also begin to falter.

Branches

Ashok Nagar Branch
1-10-223/A, Sub-register office Line
Hyderabad
+91 9052 29 29 29, 9052 19 29 29

Madhapur Branch
Plot No.3, 2nd floor, Raghuma Towers
Hyderabad
+91 9052 492929

Delhi:
Old Rajendra Nagar

Send to mail

Request for call